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Following is information about early residents of western Virginia who had the name Piersol and its variant spellings.
Entries are arranged by first name without regard to the spelling of the last name. The entries under each name are sorted by date.
I have begun this compilation because of a tremendous amount of confusion surrounds the Pennsylvania and Virginia branches of the Pearsall family. Their origin and relationships are in dispute and "The History and Genealogy of the Pearsall Family in England and America," by Clarence Pearsall, provides inadequate information to back up its assertions concerning these branches of the family. While I am still digging for some of the sources that Mr. Pearsall cited, I have found most of them and many additional sources
If you have any sources to add to this list, please let me know.

Brian Bowers

Click here to return to Piersol resources index.

Updated: July 2005

BENJAMIN
[See Western Pennsylvania Piersols and Ohio Piersols for additional listings.]
+ John Piersall wrote his will Feb. 13, 1809. Probate Nov. 18, 1811. It mentions his brother Benjamin and later mentions unnamed children of Benjamin. – "Early Records of Hampshire County, Virginia (Now West Virginia)," compiled by Clara McCormack Sage and Laura Sage Jones, page 129. [This will seems to indicate that Benjamin was still alive in 1809, which contradicts the account in "The History and Genealogy of the Pearsall Family in England and America." The Pearsall history says that Benjamin was killed by Native Americans during Lord Dunmore’s War in 1774. However, John’s will lists Benjamin and his children separately. If he were dead, John would not have mentioned him separately as an heir.]
+ The only other possible mention of a Benjamin Pearsall in Virginia’s Hampshire or Frederick counties is a reference to Benjamin Purcell in survey records. However, since a number of Purcells also appear in the records, it seems unlikely this Benjamin was a Pearsall. In the survey records, Benjamin Purcell appears as a chain carrier during a survey taken by Thomas Rutherford for Nicholas and John Friend on the Potomac on Feb. 26, 1763 – "Abstracts of Virginia’s Northern Neck Warrants & Surveys, 1697-1784, Vol. IV," page 24.

BITHIA
+ March 10, 1762 – Job and wife Bithia Pearsal of Hampshire County (mortgage) to Bryan Bruen, Merchant of Winchester, 323 acres on South Branch. Recorded March 11, 1762. Witness: Sam Dew – "Early Records of Hampshire County, Virginia (Now West Virginia)," Compiled by Clara McCormack Sage and Laura Sage Jones, page 46.
+ Birithin Pearcell [probably Bithia] receives bond in Hampshire County, Va., July 9, 1774 – "West Virginia Estate Settlements," by Ross B. Johnston, page 21.

HANNAH
+ March 12, 1774 – John and wife Hannah Pearceall of Hampshire Co (lease and release) to Leonard Tipsord of Hampshire Co. 174 acres on North Branch of Potomac. Also: April 14, 1799 – John and wife Hannah Pierceall of Hampshire Co to Ebenezer and wife Neomy McNary of Hampshire Co. Recorded April 14, 1800 – "Early Records of Hampshire County, Virginia (Now West Virginia)," Compiled by Clara McCormack Sage and Laura Sage Jones, page 46.
+ John Hartley wrote his will June 5, 1783. Probate March 9, 1784. His wife was deceased. He had six children. His heirs were: Elizabeth; Ann Harden Hannah Pearsall; Eleanor Houghland’s children, Mary, Henry, Hannah, Cornelius, Marcy, Margaret, Elianor and Ann Houghland; Mary Wilson’s children, Dan, William, James and Ruth Wilson; and Margaret. Executor: Cornelius Houghland and grandson, Dan Wilson, son of Mary Wilson. Witness: Jacob Slagle, Joseph House and Jame Doughtery. – "Early Records of Hampshire County, Virginia (Now West Virginia)," Compiled by Clara McCormack Sage and Laura Sage Jones, page 118.
+ John Piersall wrote his will Feb. 13, 1809. Probate Nov. 18, 1811. Wife was Hannah. – "Early Records of Hampshire County, Virginia (Now West Virginia)," compiled by Clara McCormack Sage and Laura Sage Jones, page 129.
+ Hannah Piersall wrote her will Jan. 22, 1812. Probate: Aug. 19, 1822. (Widow of John.) Niece, Eleanor Lyons; relatives, John Piersall Kearfoot, Amy McNary, and Anna Kearfoot. Executor: Ebenezer McNary. Witness: John McBride, Ephraim Dunn and William Fox. – "Early Records of Hampshire County, Virginia (Now West Virginia)," Compiled by Clara McCormack Sage and Laura Sage Jones, page 129.

JACOB
[See Western Pennsylvania Piersols for other possible listings.]
+ Jacob Pearsal in Capt. O’Hara’s company of Virginia militia – "Historical Register of Virginians in the Revolution," by John H. Gwathmey, page 612.
+ Pvt. Jacob Piersal listed in Col. John Gibson’s company, possibly part of a Virginia regiment at Fort McIntosh during the Revolution. No date. – "Fort McIntosh: The Story of Its History of Its and Restoration of the Site," by Frank F. Carver, from http://www.bchistory.org/beavercounty/BAHF/FortMc.Carver/Carver.Main.html.

JOB
+ Job Pearsall appears several times in Deed Book 2 of Frederick County, Va., in 1751 – "Frederick County, Virginia, Deed Books Series, Vol. I," compiled by Amelia C. Gilreath, Nokesville, Va., 1989.
- Bk 2, page 241 – 14 May 1751. [Lease] Between John Kirkendahl of County of Frederick [to] John Walton of aforesaid County … Consideration of five Shillings …. One certain Tract of Land …. On a branch of the great south branch of Potomack River called Mil Creek containing four hundred Acres the said Land being granted by deed from the Honorable Thomas Lord Fairfax Proprietor of Northern Neck the 14th Nov. 1750 … rent of one peper corn on Lady day next … Witnesses: James Wood, Job Pearsall, Abrahm. Kirkendahl. Recorded: 15 May 1751. (Page 74) [This is followed by a release for the same property, also witnessed by Job.]
- Bk 2, page 248 – 14 May 1751. [Lease] Between Matthias Kirkendahl of County of Frederick [to] Abraham Kirkendahl son of Jacob Kirkendahl of place aforesaid … Consideration of five Shillings … all that Tract of Land scituate lying & being upon the Wappocomo or great south Branch (of Potomack River) … containing three hundred & thirty seven Acres … rent of one peper corn on Lady day next … Witnesses: John Welton, Job Pearsall, John Kirkendahl. Recorded 15 May 1751. (Page 75) [This is followed by a release for the same property, also witnessed by Job.]
- Bk 2, page 387 – 15 Nov. 1751. [Lease] Between Samuel Earle Gent of County of Frederick [to] Job Pearsall of the County of Frederick .. Consideration of five Shillings … Tract of Land lying and being on the great South Branch of Potowmack … in the line of the 15th Lott … Containing three hundred and twenty three acres more or less … rent of one Ear of Indian Corn on the Lady day next … Witnesses: L. Stephens. Wm Greeway. Recorded: 16 Nov. 1751. (Page 85)
- Bk 2, page 388 – 16 Nov. 1751. [Release] Between Samuel Earle Gent of County of Frederick [to] Job Pearsall of the County of Frederick … Consideration of One hundred Pounds … 323 Acres (same as above) … Witness: same as above. Recorded: 16 Nov. 1751. (Page 85)
+ George Washington’s letter to Thomas Cresap, 18 April, 1754: "… I hope all the Flower you have or can get you will save for this purpose and other provisions and necessary’s which you think will be of use (that may not occur to my memory at present) will be laid by till our Arrival which I expect will be at Job Pearsalls abt Saturday night or Sunday next, at present I have nother more to add than that I am Yr most Hble Servt" (Footnote on text: Job Pearsal’s cabin was on the South Branch of the Potomac River about 20 miles south of Wills Creek. GW was at Pearsal’s by 19 April.) – "The Papers of George Washington, Colonial Series 1, 1748-August 1755," edited by W.W. Abbot, page 82.
+ George Washington’s diary for April 1754: "The 19th, Met an Express who had Letters from Captain Trent, at the Ohio, demanding a Reinforcement with all Speed, as he hourly expect a Body of Eight Hundred French. I tarried at Job Pearsall’s for the Arrival of the Troops, where they came the next Day. When I receive the above Express, I dispatched a Courier to Colonel Fry, to give him Notice of it." (Footnote on text: Job Pearsal was "one of the first settlers on the south branch of the Potomac, at or near the site of the present town of Romney. His cabin, on the right bank of the stream, was surrounded by a stockade. … This was on the line of the main road between Winchester, the forts on Patterson creek, Oldtown and Fort Cumberland" (TONER [3], 20). See also KOONTZ, 138.) – "The Diaries of George Washington," Vol. I, edited by Donald Jackson, page 177.
+ Fort Pearsall (also spelled Pearsal, Pearscall, and Piercehall) was a stockade fort built by Job Pearsall on the site of what is now Romney, Hampshire County, West Virginia, at the point where the road from Fort Loudoun west crossed the South Branch. "Pearsall’s" is shown on Washingotn’s map of Operations in Virginia, 1765. In the years 1754, Fort Pearsall was the chief base of supplies in Virginia on the south side of the Upper Potomac, says Lewis. In December of that years, Governor Dinwiddie ordered "all the garrisons of the Branch to evacuate their forts, and repair to Pearsall’s," but this order was almost immediately countermanded. Captain Thomas Cocks’ Journal in 1755 says that he marched from Winchester, September 8, reached "Piercehalls on South Branch" on the 11th, "lay there" the 12th, and "march’d to Hedges Patterson Creek" on the 13th, which gives one a general idea of the location with reference to the other places. Fort Pearsall was considered an important place, and when the Virginia regiment was reduced in size in 1757, Governor Dinwiddie instructed Colonel Washington, May 16, 1757, to station a garrison of forty-five men under Captain Robert McKenzie, at the fort. A month later, Lieutenant James Livingston wrote to Washington that he was endeavoring to half friendly Indians at that place. (Footnote: Hamilton, vol. I, p. 267; vol. Ii, pp. 72, 96, 321; vol. Iii, p. 89; Lewis, pp. 212-213; Ford, Writings of Washington, vol. I, pp. 274, 275; vol. Ii, pp. 40, 41, 42; Journals, 1761-1765, p. 114.) – "The Virginia Frontier, 1754-1763," Louis K. Koontz, page 138.
+ Job Pearsal of Hampshire County, Va., submitted a claim for reimbursement from the colonial government of Virginia "for one hog and salt" in March 1756 – "The Statues at Large, Being a Collection of All the Laws of Virginia," Vol. VII, by William W. Hening, page 25.
+ Petition of Job Pearsall of Hampshire County who in 1756 had a large fort erected on his land on the order of Col. Washington of the Virginia Regiment. The timber was cut down in great quantities and used by the inhabitants and the garrison until the end of Gen. Forbe’s campaign in 1758. When the Indian War began in 1763, the fort was repaired and said Pearsall pitched on for a garrison until 1764. Many times he piloted officers and parties and was obliged to return by night for security. 28 March 1767. (The petition continued to be referred for later action until Job died in 1769. See pages 193 and 195.) – "Virginia’s Colonial Soldier," by Llyod DeWitt Bockstruck, pages 192.
+ Orders to George Washington from John St. Clair, June 13, 1758. Mentions Govr Sharpe, Colonel Byrd, Lieut Colonel Mercer, Job Pearsall’s and Edward’s, Mr. Commissary Walker, Captain Stewart’s Troop Light Horse. Also, a receipt from Robt McKenzie to Colonel George Washington, June 22, 1758. Mentions Lieut. Colonel Adam Stephen, Pearsall’s Fort. – "Colonial Soldiers of the South 1732-1774," pages 504 and 505. ["Pearsall’s" and "Edward’s" refer to the forts of those names.]
+ Thomas Watts wrote will on July 11, 1758. Probate: Dec. 12, 1758. Witness: Job Pearsell, Thos. Bull and David Wilfred. – "Early Records of Hampshire County, Virginia (Now West Virginia)," Compiled by Clara McCormack Sage and Laura Sage Jones, page 137.
+ Job is listed numerous times in early land transactions in Hampshire County, Va. Following are some of the listings that appears in "Early Records of Hampshire County, Virginia (Now West Virginia)," Compiled by Clara McCormack Sage and Laura Sage Jones, Genealogical Publishing Company, Baltimore.
- July 28, 1761 – Samuel Earl and wife Elizabeth of Frederick County (lease and release) to Job Pearsal of Hampshire County Lot #10, 323 acres on South Branch. Recorded Aug. 10, 1762. Witness: J. Keith, Gabriel Jones and Henry Begly. (Page 15)
- Sept. 7, 1762 – John Hopkins of North Carolina (power of attorney) to Job Pearsall. Gives Job Pearsall authority to sell land to Thomas Cressap. Recorded Dec. 13. (Page 26)
- March 10, 1762 – Job and wife Bithia Pearsal of Hampshire County (mortgage) to Bryan Bruen, Merchant of Winchester, 323 acres on South Branch. Recorded March 11, 1762. Witness: Sam Dew. (Page 46)
- Nov. 10, 1766 – Job Pearsall of Hampshire County to Luke Collins of Hampshire County, 323 acres on South Branch. Recorded Nov. 12, 1766. (Page 46)
- Dec. 12, 1763 – Job Pearsall of Hampshire County (lease and release) to Thomas Cressap of Frederick County, Md., Lot #64, 310 acres on South Branch. Recorded Dec. 13. (Page 46)
- Surveys on Wappacomo – South Branch of Potomac. #16 to Job Pearsall and Sam Earl. (Page 63)
+ "To be sold, 323 Acres of land, on the South Branch of Potomack, in Hampshire County, Virginia, joining Lines with Romney, the County Town. There is a Fort on the Premises, and some other Improvements; about 80 Acres of clear Land; the Soil very rich. For Terms apply to Bryan Bruin, in Winchester, or Joe Pearsall, living on the Premises aforesaid, who will shew the same." – The Pennsylvania Gazette of Philadelphia, March 14, 1765, as recorded by Accessible Archives, Inc, at the Electronic Text Center of the University of Virginia Library.
+ John Pearsall, heir of Job Pearsall for whom survd, escheated from Joseph Hamlin; 10 Sept. 1769-17 Nov. 1769; this being part of a larger tract (Lot 11) granted Joseph Hamlin for 289 a. by this office 7 June 1749. Hamlin died intestate without known heirs (see following affidavits.). 230 a. on Pattersons Crk; adj. Christ (Lott 10), Parker (Lott 12), Bagley (part of Lott 11 Bagley bought of Joseph Hamlin), Beaver (Lott 9) house drawn of 230 a. tract. CC-Garrett Reasoner & Jacob Criss. Present – Henry Bagley & Power Hazell. Surv. Moffett.
The following notes are from numerous 1769 affidavits in a dispute after Hamlin’s death. John Parker sd Hamlin solicited Edwrd Pursell to come live with him but Purslee inclined to go to Carolina. Thos (X) Queen sd Hamlin told him Job Persall would get his land if he outlived him. Henry Cyger declared the same. Job Pearsall had his improvements on Hamlin’s place apprd by Robert Bell (?), John Carpenter & Michael Diebolt (GS) – at L80. Usley Crist, wife of John Crist, sd Hamlin told her that whosoever lived on his plantation & maintained him would have it. Elizabeth Seaver sd Hamlin told her his land should be divided equally between two orphans, a boy of Ann Pursell alies hampton named Jonathan & the other a girl belonging to Elizabeth Begley alias Brannon alias Persall named Bathia Brannon. John Ramsey sd he asked Hamlin if he had no children to leave his land & Hamlin said he had but they ware so far off that Before they came to prove themselves Hairs ye costs & trouble would overgo ye profit. It had been Pearsall’s home in sickness & health for a long time & Hamlin was determined to make old Mr. Pearsall his hair & that sum time before he had determined to give it to Bagley’s Wifes daughter & Edward Purcells Son, but now Pearsall should have it. (Bagley’s wife formerly married to Robert Brannon.) Additional affidavits were taken from Noah Hampton, Nicholas Seaver, Zadok Wright, Nicohlas Crist, Mrs. Alexander Gibney & Martha Wilson. 15 May 1770 – Summons to Ann Purcell on behalf of son Jonathan, a minor, & Henry Begley to shew cause why Deed should not issue to John Pearsall, devisee of Job Pearsall, decd.
Will of Job Pearsall (copy) 20 May 1770, proved 14 Aug. 1770. Land to my son John after my wife’s decease. Son John to pay L20 to each of my daughters Margaret & Eleanor when 21 or Day of Marriage, the land given John of much greater value than what I had to give any of my other children. Execs John Pearsall & Samuel Dew (?). Proved by oaths of Joseph Branton & John Carpenter (?).
1771 – Lewis Green, aged 35, swore he was working for Job Pearsall on Joseph Hamlin’s planation on 1 Jan. 1768 & Hamlin sd he would leave land to Pearsall after his death. Thomas McGuire and Nathaniel Ware, aged 43, gave their affidavits. N.d. – His Lordship is of opinion Ann Purcell has no right to the land & Henry Bagley has left the colony. Deed to issue to John Pearsall. (Note: All question marks are in transcript.) – "Abstracts of Virginia’s Northern Neck Warrants & Surveys Hampshire, Berkeley, Loudoun, Fairfax, King George, Westmoreland, Richmond, Northumberland & Lancaster Counties 1697-1784," Vol. IV," compiled by Peggy S. Joyner, Portsmouth, Va., 1995, pages 52-52.
+ P-31: The late Job Pearsall of Hampshire Co. before he died did inform Office he had 239 A. of 289 A. granted Joseph Hamlin 7 June 1749 known as Lot. No. 11 on Patterson’s Cr. in said Co. Joseph Hamlin died intestate without known Heir and made no legal disposal of said part whereby it escheated. Pearsall entered same as escheated. Advertisement from Office by Samuel Dew Deputy Clerk of said Co. Resurv. By John Moffett shows 230 A. in bounds. John Pearsall heir at Law of said Job Pearsall applied for Deed but Caveats had been entered by Ann Purcell & Henry Begley on behalf of some Infants. Matter was determined in Favor of John Pearsall. Adj. Lot No. 9, land Henry Begley bought of Hamlin. 20 Apr. 1771 – "Virginia Northern Neck Land Grants, Vol. II, 1742-1775," compiled by Gertrude E. Gray, 1988, pages 210-211.
+ S-507: John Piersall heir at Law of Job Piersall dec’d asne. of Thomas B. Martin ½ A. (Lott No. 61.) in town of Romney adj. The Commons, Lott No. 71, Lott No. 62, High Street. 26 June 1778 – "Virginia Northern Neck Land Grants, Vol. II, 1775-1800," compiled by Gertrude E. Gray, 1993, page 69.
+ ROMNEY PLAN; 3 May 1811. Lot Number 61. Job Pierceall – Assignd to John Piersall Heir at law to Job Piersall decd. – "Abstracts of Virginia’s Northern Neck Warrants & Surveys 1653-1781, Vol. V," compiled by Peggy Shomo Joyner, pages 91-92.

JOHN – son of Job [Also see listings under Job that aren’t repeated below.]
+ John Pearsall on Jan. 30 to April 2, 1761, had 174 acres surveyed on the North Branch of the Potomac. Chain carriers were Humphrey Westell and John Ashby Jr. Pilot was Jos. Calvin. Surveyor was Moffett – "Abstracts of Virginia’s Northern Neck Warrants & Surveys, Hampshire, Berkeley, Loudoun, Fairfax, King George, Westmoreland, Richmond, Northumberland & Lancaster Counties, 1697-1784," Vol. IV, compiled by Peggy S. Joyner, page 52.
+ John appears in numerous records of land grants in Hampshire County. The following listings are from "Sims Index-Land Grants in West Virginia," by Edgar B. Sims, state auditor, Charleston. W.Va., 1952.
1762 – John Pierceall, 174 acres, Wts Potomac, Book 1, page 162.
1771 – John Pearsall, 230 acres, Patterson’s Creek, Book 3, page 559.
1789 – John Pearcall, 124 acres.3r.8p., adjacent H Harrell, Book 8, page 228.
1793 – John Pearsall, 200 acres, Patterson Creek, Book 6, page 361.
1800 – John Pearsall, 100 acres, Sugar Camp, Book 9, page 322.
+ John Pearcell received a bond in Hampshire County, Va., on July 4, 1770 – "West Virginia Estate Settlements," by Ross B. Johnston, page 21.
+ John is listed numerous times in early land transactions in Hampshire County, Va., which is now in West Virginia. – "Early Records of Hampshire County, Virginia (Now West Virginia)," Compiled by Clara McCormack Sage and Laura Sage Jones, Genealogical Publishing Company, Baltimore.
- March 12, 1774 – John and wife Hannah Pearceall of Hampshire Co (lease and release) to Leonard Tipsord of Hampshire Co. 174 acres on North Branch of Potomac. (Page 46)
- Feb. 11, 1790 – Trustees of Frankfort (now county seat of Mineral Co.) (bill of sale) to John Pearsall of Hampshire Co. One quarter acre in Frankfort. Recorded Feb. 11, 1790. (Page 20)
- Nov. 14, 1797 – John Pearsal of Hampshire Co to Peter Williams of Hampshire Co. Half acre in Romney. Recorded Dec. 18, 1797. Wit. And. Wodrow, Wm. Linton, Eli Davis and James Gibson. (Page 46)
- July 2, 1798 – Christian and wife Musselman of Hampshire Co to John Pearceall of Hampshire Co. Half acre in Frankfort. Recorded Sept. 17, 1798. Witness: John Mitchell, John Keller, A. King and Henry Protzman. (Page 43)
- April 14, 1799 – John and wife Hannah Pierceall of Hampshire Co to Ebenezer and wife Meony McNary of Hampshire Co. Recorded April 14, 1800. [This was John’s sister, Naomy, and her husband.] (Page 46)
- Dec. 28, 1799 – Peter and wife Ann Williams of Hampshire Co to John Pierceall, John Jack, Henry Heinsmann and James Dailey of Hampshire Co. Half acre in Romney. Recorded Jan. 20, 1800. Witness: Patrick Baker, Charles D. Houser, Henry Myers and Henry Hines. (Page 56)
+ S-507: John Piersall heir at Law of Job Piersall dec’d asne. of Thomas B. Martin ½ A. (Lott No. 61.) in town of Romney adj. The Commons, Lott No. 71, Lott No. 62, High Street. 26 June 1778 – "Virginia Northern Neck Land Grants, Vol. II, 1775-1800," compiled by Gertrude E. Gray, 1993, page 69.
+ John is listed in Hampshire County in Virginia’s censuses of 1782 and 1784. 1782 – John Piersall, three fee whites and five slaves. 1784 – John Pearsall, four free whites, one dwelling and three other buildings. – "Early Records of Hampshire County, Virginia (Now West Virginia)," Compiled by Clara McCormack Sage and Laura Sage Jones, page 95.
+ "Office of the Secretary of the Land Office, 18th O’r, 1781. John Pearsall enters a Caveat against the acceptance of a Survey made to John Augusta Washington upon an Order of Survey, No. 1020, ent’d 3d Ap’l, 1769. Alledging he had a prior Right to the said Land by an Improvement purchased of Cornelius Hogeland. David Kennedy, S’y. [See Judg’t of Court Nisi prius at Union Town in favour of Washington.]" – "Pennsylvania Archives," Series 3, Vol. 2, page 627-628.
+ John Pearsall mentioned as owning land in Westmoreland County, Pa., that bounded land granted to George Washington. Washington granted land on Feb. 8, 1782 – "Annals of Southwestern Pennsylvania," by Lewis C. Walkinshaw, page 424.
+ ROMNEY PLAN; 3 May 1811. Lot Number 61. Job Pierceall – Assignd to John Piersall Heir at law to Job Piersall decd. – "Abstracts of Virginia’s Northern Neck Warrants & Surveys 1653-1781, Vol. V," compiled by Peggy Shomo Joyner, pages 91-92.
+ John Piersall – wrote will Feb. 13, 1809. Probate Nov. 18, 1811. Wife: Hannah. Eleanor Lyons and Amee Kearfoot, daughters of Cornelius Hoagland, deceased. Sister: Rachel Mooney. Brother: Benjamin. Sister: Margaret Jackson and Eleanor Hall or Hill. Sister: Rachel has 7 children, Rachel, Isaac, Edmund, and David Mooney; also Mordecia, Elijah, and John Berkley or Barkley. Benjamin has children named probably nieces and nephews. Kisiah Hill, Hannah Kelly, sister (?) Naomy McNary, (husband Ebenezer), her children to get Alleg. Co MD land. Exec. William Vance and John Snyder. Wit. Alex King, Wm. Fox, Vincent William and Lewis Dunn. (Note: Question mark in transcript.) – "Early Records of Hampshire County, Virginia (Now West Virginia)," compiled by Clara McCormack Sage and Laura Sage Jones, page 129. The abstract doesn’t mention John’s slaves. In his will, he made provisions that they be freed. The will – which is in Will Book 5, page 233 at the Hampshire County courthouse in Romney – stipulates that Will, George, Lucy and Sucky and their children be taken to Pennsylvania immediately to be emancipated. Sydney, a woman, was to continue serving Hannah but also be taken to Pennsylvania to be freed at Hannah’s death. Forrester was to serve Hannah for four years and Mack was to serve her for five years. Interestingly, John could not sign his name but left his mark on the will.

PETER
+ Peter Pearsall receives bond in Hampshire County, Va., on Nov. 13, 1770. – "West Virginia Estate Settlements: An Index to Wills, Inventories, Appraisements, Land Grants and Surveys to 1850,"by Ross B. Johnston, page 21.

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