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Hawk

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The Hawk family lived in Northeastern Pennsylvania during the late 1700s and early 1800s.
 

Updated: July 2005

CONRAD AND MARGARETHA HAWK
Conrad Hawk lived in what is now Monroe County in northeastern Pennsylvania in the early 1800s. His father may have been an older Conrad Hawk. (1)
Conrad married a woman named Maria Margarthe, who is identified as a Fisher in the Hawk genealogy, by Atwood James Shupp.
Children: (2)
Johannes, or John, born Jan. 7, 1803.
George, probably born Oct. 15, 1804.
Samuel, born Aug. 31, 1809. May have died young.
Johann Peter, born March 19, 1812.
Michael.
Joseph, born July 1, 1816.
Conrad, born April 3, 1819.
The family name, which appears to be of German origin, is spelled a variety of ways, including Hawk, Haak, Haag and Hack.
Conrad lived in what is now Monroe County in northeastern Pennsylvania. During much of his lifetime, the area was part of Northampton County so many records related to the family are found in that county.
In the 1810 Census, Conrad Haak Jr. appears in Chestnuthill Township, Northampton County. His household contained two males under 10, one male 10-16 and one female 26-45.
In the 1820 Census, Conrad Hawk jr. again appears in Chestnuthill Township. His household contained two males under 10, two males 10-16, two males 16-18, two males 18-26, one male over 45 and one female over 45. Four of the family worked in agriculture and one is listed as a manual laborer.
Conrad died sometime before Nov. 7, 1855, when his will was submitted for probate. At the time his will was written, Jan. 26, 1848, Conrad owned two tracts to land – one 80 acres and the other 17 acres. The land was inherited by Peter, who was instructed to take care of his mother and youngest brother, Conrad, "during his life and give him food and clothing." Perhaps this indicates that Conrad was an invalid. Conrad’s other sons – George, John, Michael and Joseph – each inherited $10. The will was marked rather than signs, probably indicating that Conrad was illiterate. (3)
Conrad is buried in Kresgeville, Pa., according to the Hawk genealogy, and Maria died in 1870.
(1) "Genealogy of Conrad and Elizabeth (Borger) Hawk, 1744-1990," by Atwood James Shupp, page 246, identifies the Conrad and Elizabeth Hawk as the younger man’s father. I have not yet found documents to back this up conclusively. There were two Hawk families in the area in the late 1700s, Conrad’s and the family of George Hawk, who appears to have been Conrad’s brother. Either man could have been the father of the younger Conrad. That said, a case can be made that the elder Conrad was our Conrad’s father. The 1820 Census of Chestnuthill Township, Northampton County, list both a "Conrad Hawk sen" and a "Conrad Hawk jr." However, the junior and senior may simply indicate two men with the same names but of different ages. Also, a "Conrad Haak, the elder" appears repeatedly in the records of the Salem Union Church. The younger Conrad also worshipped at that church, but so did George’s family. As tantalizing as many of these hints are, it’s difficult to say unconditionally that Conrad was the son of Conrad. According to the Hawk genealogy, Conrad Hawk Sr. was born in Germany in 1744 and immigrated to America in the mid-1700s. Conrad married Elizabeth Borger. He lived in Middle Creek, Pa., where he died in 1825. He is buried in Gilbert, Pa. (2) "Salem Union Church (or Church of Peace) Lutheran and Reformed Congregations (Now Gilbert, Monroe County) Pennsylvania," Vol. 1, compiled by Elizabeth D. Walters. The date for Johannes and probably date for George were found in confirmation records on an insert in the main book at the Monroe County Historical Society in Stroudsburg, Pa. The other appear as follows: Samuel, page 9; Johann Peter, page 13; Joseph, page 20; and Conrad, page 26. Michael is listed in Conrad’s will in Monroe County Will File 92 T. Conrad is listed as Conrad’s youngest son. (3) Monroe County, Pa., Will File 92 T.

JOHN and FANNY HAWK
John Hawk was born Jan. 7, 1803, to Conrad and Maria Margarthe Hawk in northeastern Pennsylvania. (1)
Married Fanny, also listed as Frances and Anna, who was born May 1, 1807. Fanny was possibly the "Fennie Dotter" who served as a baptismal sponsor along with "Johannes Haak" twice in 1824. A "Vronika Dotter," the 15-year-old daughter of Conrad, took her first communion on Dec. 24, 1821. She may be Fanny. (2)
Children: (3)
Catharina, born March 5, 1826.
Simon, born Nov. 11, 1827.
Aaron, born about 1830.
Johannes, or John, born June 29, 1832.
Sally A., born about 1834.
Conrad Jackson, born Dec. 31, 1836.
Daniel, born May 8, 1837, and died in November 1837.
Lucy Ann, born Oct. 12, 1838. Married Jacob D. Bowers.
Margaret, born in 1841 and died Dec. 5, 1863.
Mary, born in 1845 and died Dec. 19, 1865.
Frances, born Sept. 27, 1846, and died Jan. 31, 1847.
The family name, which appears to be of German origin, is spelled a variety of ways, including Hawk, Haak and Hack.
On Deb. 15, 1822, Johannes Haack took his first communion at the Lutheran congregation of the Salem Union Church in what is now Gilbert, Pa.
In the 1820s and 1830s, some of John and Fanny’s children were baptized at Salem Union Church, a German-language church that served Lutheran and Reformed congregations in Chestnuthill Township, Monroe County. The family appears to have moved west to Luzerne County in the 1820s or 1830s. John is listed as a laborer living in Newport Township, Luzerne County in the 1850 Census. The 1860 Census lists him as a farmer and the 1870 Census says he was a retired farmer.
The 1870 Census indicates that neither John nor Frances could read or write. However, neither the 1850 nor 1860 censuses note this. It’s possible they only read and wrote German.
John died Dec. 9, 1877, and Fanny died March 22, 1879. They are buried at Newport Cemetery in Newport Township.
(1) "Salem Union Church (or Church of Peace) Lutheran and Reformed Congregations (Now Gilbert, Monroe County) Pennsylvania," Vol. 1, compiled by Elizabeth D. Walters. This information was found in confirmation records on an insert in the main book at the Monroe County Historical Society in Stroudsburg, Pa. Date of birth is confirmed in the cemetery records file at the Wyoming Valley Historical and Geological Society in Wilkes-Barre, Pa. Pennsylvania is listed as the place of birth in the 850, 1860 and 1870 censuses of Newport Township, Luzerne County, Pa. (2) Birth date comes from cemetery files cited above. The baptismal record is in the Salem Union Church records, page 40. "Genealogy of Conrad and Elizabeth (Borger) Hawk, 1744-1990," by Atwood James Shupp, identifies Fanny as a Dotter. The confirmation is recorded on the same page of the insert that mentioned John’s confirmation. (3) The births of Catharina, Simon, Johannes and Conrad are listed in the Salem Union Church records, pages 44, 50, 60 and 127. The names and dates for the other children are listed in the census records, which offer a few conflicting dates. In addition, the details on Daniel, Margaret, Mary and Frances come from the cemetery listings cited above. It’s also possible that the couple had a daughter named Rebecca. In the 1860 Census, a 10-year-old Rebecca appears in the household of John Hawk Jr., who is listed next to John and Francis. Since John was 28 and his wife, Amanda, is listed as 22, it seems unlikely that Rebecca was their child – unless John was married very young to another women who had since died.

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God demonstrates his own love for us in this:
While we were still sinners, Christ died for us.
- Romans 5:8