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Warner

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Richard Warner was born about 1772 in Connecticut and moved to New York.  His son Edward eventually moved to Wyandot County, Ohio.

Updated: May 2013

RICHARD and POLLY WARNER
    Richard Warner was born about 1772 in Connecticut.  He is said to have been the son of Joseph and Huldah (Nichols) Warner of Waterbury, Conn. (1)
    Married Polly, who was born about 1777, probably in Connecticut.  She is said to have been born March 4, 1777 to Gideon Hickox Jr. and his wife, Philena (Smith), of Waterbury. (2)
    Children: (3)
    Obadiah.
    Deacon Sheldon, born Nov. 20, 1794.
    Adna, born about 1796.
    Minerva.
    Maria.
    Edward, born May 14, 1799.
    David, born about 1802.
    Curtis, born between 1801 and 1810.
    Rachel.
    Electra.
    Calvin.
    Florilla, born July 6, 1815.
    Elmina.
    Richard P.
    Possibly Lucena.
    “History of Chenango and Madison Counties, New York,” published in 1880, contains a brief biographical note on Richard.  “Richard Warner came from Waterbury, Conn., in 1801, and settled on 50 acres in Taylor, then Solon, and in 1810 removed to Pitcher, to the place now occupied by John Dryer, a half mile south of the village.  He afterwards removed to the village, where he and his wife died, the former March 25, 1857, aged 85, and the latter, (Polly,) Sept. 24, 1849, aged 72.  Their children were fifteen in number: Obadiah, Deacon, Sheldon, Adna, Minerva, Maria, Edward, David, Curtis, Rachel, Electra, Calvin, Florilla, Elmina, and Richard P.”
    A profile on Lucian D. Warner in “Men of Mark in Connecticut,” restates some of this information. “Mr. Warner was peculiarly and prominently identified with this community, peculiarly because his paternal grandfather, Richard Warner, was born in Salem, (now Naugatuck), away back in 1772.  His son, Adna, the father of L.D. Warner, was also born here in 1796.  Grandfather and father in the year 1800 went into what was then the wild West and settled in Pitcher, Chenango County, New York.  Here in 1839, September 18th, Lucian D. Warner was born.  Like most pioneer settlers of those times they had many obstacles to overcome and secure a living only by the greatest of diligence, as the family was a large one of 15 children.” (4)
    In the 1820 Census, Richard appears in German Township, Chenango County.  His household contained one male under 10, one male 16-18, three males 16-26, one male 26-45, one male 45 or older, two females under 10, three females 10-16 and one female 26-45.
    In the 1830 Census, Richard appears in Pitcher, Chenango County.  His household contained one male 5-9, one male 50-59, one female 15-19 and one female 50-59.  The household of Shelden Warner appears on the same page, with one male 5-9, one male 30-39, one female 10-14 and one female 30-39.
    A profile of Pitcher in “History of Chenango and Madison Counties, New York” states: “Among the early settlers were Benjamin and Abel Fairchild, Ebenezer Wakely, Jonas Hinman, Silas Beebe, George Taylor, Elijah Fenton, Jonathan Chandler, Abijah Rhines, Gideon Peet, M. Millard, Lewis and Philo Blackman and Richard Warner.” (5)
    Several of Richard’s children moved to Ohio.  Edward and Curtis appear in Jackson Township, Hardin County, Ohio, in the 1840 Census and David appears in the same township in the 1850 Census.
    Polly died Sept. 24, 1849.
    In the 1850 Census of Pitcher, Richard is listed as a 79-year-old farmer with property valued at $2,500.  The only other person listed in the household is Florilla Warner, 35.
    Richard died March 25, 1857.  (6)
    (1) The birth year is estimated from “History of Chenango and Madison Counties, New York,” by James H. Smith, published in 1880, page 432, which states Richard was 85 when he died on March 25, 1857.  According to the 1850 Census of Pitcher, Chenango County, N.Y., Richard was 79 years old and was born in Connecticut.  That age would put his birth year at about 1771.  The link to his parents appears in “History of John Warner of ‘Increase’ 1635,” compiled by James A. Warner, pages 55 and 119.  However, no Richard is listed among Joseph’s children recorded in “The Town and City of Waterbury, Connecticut,” by Sarah Prichard and others, 1896, page 145 in the appendix.  A “Jonson” is listed as having been baptized on June 21, 1772.  It’s uncertain whether this is a reference to Richard, it’s a mistake or Richard had no direct connection to Joseph.  (2) Polly Warner, who died Sept. 24, 1849, at age 72, is listed as the wife of Richard in the cemetery list for the Pitcher Congregational Church Cemetery, which is available on Roots Web at www.rootsweb.com/~nychenan/ptchcngr.htm  Also, Polly and Edward are mentioned as the parents of Edward Warner in “The History of Hardin County, Ohio,” published in 1883 by Warner, Beers, & Co., page 673.  The link to Polly’s parents appears in “History of John Warner of ‘Increase’ 1635,” page 199.  Richard might have been married a second time, after 1850.  The list for the Pitcher Congregational Church Cemetery mentions a Lucy G. (Park) Warner as a wife of Richard.   She died June 15, 1859 at age 43.  Concerning her place of birth, the 1880 Census of Forest, Jackson Township, Hardin County, Ohio, indicates that both parents of Edward Warner were born in Connecticut.  (3) The children are listed in “History of Chenango and Madison Counties, New York.”  Edward’s birth date appears in the Hardin County history.  The birth dates for Sheldon and Florilla appear in the cemetery list for the Pitcher Congregational Church Cemetery.  Curtis is listed as between age 30 and 39 in the 1840 Census of Jackson Township, Hardin County, Ohio.  “History of John Warner of ‘Increase’ 1635,” page 119, lists Richard’s children and adds birth dates.  The book cites the Chenango history as a source for information on Richard but obviously uses additional sources.  According to the book, Richard’s children were Obadiah, born April 15, 1793; Sheldon (also known as Deacon Sheldon), Nov. 20, 1794; Adna, April 9, 1796; Minerva, Jan. 22, 1798; Edward, May 14, 1799; Maria, Dec. 3, 1800; David, Feb. 2, 1802; Curtis, July 4, 1803; Rachel, July 4, 1805; Electa, 1807; Lucena, July 5, 1809; Calvin, August 1812; Florella, July 1815; Elmira, Sept. 21, 1817; and Richard P., April 16, 1819.  Lucena is not mentioned in the Chenango history.  (4) “Men of Mark in Connecticut: Ideals of American Life Told in Biographies and Autobiographies of Eminent Living Americans,” Vol. IV, edited by Col. N.G. Osborn, page 303.  (5) Page 431.  (6) Pitcher Congregational Church Cemetery list.


EDWARD and SOPHRONIA WARNER
    Edward Warner was born May 14, 1799, to Richard and Polly Warner. (1)
    Married Sophronia C. Sales.  Sophronia was probably born in New York State.  It seems likely that Edward married a second time.  Starting in 1850 Census records indicate that Edward’s wife was a Mary who was born about 1805 in Ohio. (2)
    Children: (3)
    Mary Othelia.
    Edward C., born Aug. 1, 1826.
    Bellva.  Married George M. Love.
    Maria.
    Adeline.  Married George Ketch.
    Lemira, born about 1833.  Married Andrew Clark.
    Artemissa, born April 9, 1834.  Married John McDaniel.
    Calvin Elijah, born May 22, 1836.
    Joseph V., born about 1838.
    Sophronia C., born about 1842.  Married a man named Meeks.
    “The History of Hardin County, Ohio,” which was published in 1883, contains a brief biographical sketch of Edward.  “Edward Warner was born in New Haven, Conn., May 14, 1799, and when a lad, his parents, Richard and Polly Warner, removed to Cortland County, N.Y., but he remained with his grandfather in Connecticut for some time, after which he went to his parents in New York.  In the fall of 1828, he removed to Seneca County, Ohio.  Before leaving New York, he married Sophronia Sales.  In the fall of 1835, he removed to this county and settled on land now owned by Samuel Waltermire, in Section 5, Jackson Township.  Here he opened out right in the woods, and commenced to erect a cabin.  From the few settlers then in the vicinity, he could get but seven to help him raise his cabin, and as a substitute for men he used oxen to roll up the logs to their proper places.  He has now been a resident in the county nearly half a century; has witnessed the wonderful transformation of these mighty forests to fine, cultivated farms and beautiful homes.  He was present at the organization of the township, and cast his vote at the first election, and was elected one of the first Trustees.  He is now eighty-four years of age, and almost totally blind, having lost his sight about thirteen years ago.  He is the father of nine children – Mary Othelia, Edward C., Bellva, Maria, Adeline, Lemira, Artemissa, Calivin E., Joseph V. and Sophronia C., all of whom, who now survive, have moved away.”
    In the 1830 Census, Edward Warner appears in Scipio Township, Seneca Township, Ohio.  His household contained one male under 5 years old, one male 30-39, two females under 5 and one female 20-29.
    In the 1840 Census, the Warners appear in Jackson Township, Hardin County.  Their household contained two males under 5, one male 10-14, one male 40-49, one female under 5, three females 5-9, and two females 10-14 – for a total of one adult and nine children.
    It appears that Sophronia died before the 1840 census was taken since no females older than 14 are listed.  She may have died soon after Joseph was born about 1838. (4)
    On Aug. 19, 1841, Edward married Mary Adams.  According to the 1850 Census, Mary was born about 1805 in Ohio.  It’s interesting to note that Mary’s only known child, Sophronia C., apparently was named after Edward’s first wife.
    An Edward Warner was among the first settlers of Wyandot County, Ohio. The name appears among those of people who owned real estate in Jackson Township when it was separated from Hardin County in 1845.  This is probably Edward C. since he appears in that township in later census records. (5)
    In the 1850 Census, Edward is listed as a farmer in Jackson Township with property valued at $2,000.  In the 1860 Census, Edward is listed as a farmer with real estate valued at $3,600 and personal property valued at $500.  In 1870, Edward is listed as a farmer with real estate valued at $5,000 and person property valued at $250.  In addition to Mary, his household contained a domestic servant named Sarah Adams, age 56.  In 1880, Edward is listed as a retired farmer listing in Forest in Jackson Township.  The census also indicates that Edward was blind, which is mentioned in the biographical note in the Hardin County history.  It also indicates that Mary was “Maimed, crippled, bedridden or otherwise disabled,” and that should couldn’t read or write.  In addition to Mary, his household contained his daughter, Lemina Glick, and a servant named Maud, who was 13.  The first few letters of her last name a faded but the last letters are “let” – or possibly “avlet.”
    Edward is said to have died on Oct. 28, 1890. (6)
(1) “The History of Hardin County, Ohio,” published in 1883 by Warner, Beers & Co., page 673.  Since this account was written during Edward’s lifetime, it would seem to be reliable.  An Edward is listed among the children of Richard Warner in from “History of Chenango and Madison Counties, New York,” by James H. Smith, published in 1880, page 432.  Edward’s place of birth is listed New York in the death certificates of his children Artemissa and Calvin – see below.  However, the 1900 Census of Jackson Township, Hardin County, states that the younger Edward’s father was born in Connecticut.  (2) Sophronia is mentioned as Edward’s wife in the Hardin County history and the obituary of her daughter Artemissa.  Concerning her birthplace, the 1900 Census of Jackson Township, Hardin County, states that the younger Edward’s father was born in Connecticut and his mother was born in New York.  However, Artemissa’s death certificate lists Sophrona’s birth place as Ohio.  The possibility of a second marriage for Edward raises questions that could easily be answered with access to records in Ohio.  However, we do know enough to surmise that Edward did marry a second time even though no second marriage is mentioned in the biographical sketch on Edward in the 1883 “The History of Hardin County, Ohio.”  First, no female older than 14 is listed in Edward’s household in the 1840 Census of Jackson Township, Hardin County, Ohio.  Sophronia had probably died by this time.  Then, in the 1850 Census, the second line – usually reserved for the wife – lists Mary, who was born about 1805 in Ohio.  All subsequent census records for the Warners state that Mary was born in Ohio, so it seems unlikely that Mary was a nickname for Sophronia.  (3) Children’s names are in the Hardin County history.  Birth date for Calvin is recorded on his death certificate in Wyandot County, Ohio, dated April 26, 1921.  Birth date for Edward is recorded on his death certificate in Marion County, dated Aug. 4, 1922.  Other birth years for most come from the 1850 Census of Jackson Township, Hardin County, Ohio.  Details on Artemissa come from an obituary clipped from an unidentified newspaper.  The obituary also mentions Edward, Calvin and Sophronia, whose last name is Meeks.  In addition, the 1860 Census of Jackson Township, shows a 34-year-old Eliza, 7-year-old Ann and 4-year-old Samuel.  I am uncertain who this is.  It’s possible that she’s the widow of Calvin – but this would be based on the fact that her last name is listed as Warner and both Joseph and the younger Edward were still alive in 1860.  However, I don’t know whether Calvin was alive or dead at this point.  The marriages of Adaline, Belva and Lemira Mary appear in “Marriage Records of Hardin County, Ohio, From 1833 to 1865, Inclusive,” by the Fort McArthur Chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution.  While this source says Lemina married Andrew Clark, the 1880 Census appears to list her as Lemina Glick.  This may indicate a second marriage or one of the references may be a clerical error.  The source also lists the marriage of a Mary to John K. Hare, which probably refers to Mary Othelia but might refer to Maria.  (4) “Marriage Records of Hardin County.”  (5) “The History of Wyandot County, Ohio,” page 835.  (6) “History of John Warner of ‘Increase’ 1635,” compiled by James A. Warner, page 119.  No source is cited for the death date.

 

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