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Following is information on the van Garden/van Gorder families of New Netherland, New York and New Jersey.   
 

"Minutes of the Court of Fort Orange and Beverwyck," translated and edited by A.J.F. Van Laer, The University of the State of New York, 1920-1923.
+ Dec. 5, 1656: "Albert Gysbertsen, wheelwright, requests a certain lot for a garden." Vol. 1, page 305.
+ July 4, 1657: "Albert, the wheelwright, appearing before the court, complains that Harmen Jacobsen Bambus, who owes him 20 beavers and fl. 150: - in seawan, absents himself from here and keeps himself in hiding in the Esopus. He requests that the said Harman Jacobsen be brought hither at the expense of the party who shall prove to be in the wrong. Fait." Vol. 2, page 53.
+ Sept. 5, 1657: Albert Gysbertsen serves as witness in a case in which Ulderick Kleyn claimed that Eldert Gerbertsen "called his wife a woman who had been flogged and branded on the scaffold at Amsterdam and said that she had committed adultery with the crazy farmer and hageboom [probably indicating a vagabond] named Jacob Klomp. The defendant answers that the plaintiff’s wife first called him a rascal and a thief and his wife a whore." Kleyn produced four women as witnesses to support his case. "The defendant in rebuttal produces Albert Gysbertsen, wheelwright, who, appearing before the court, declares that last Wednesday, being the 29th of August, Eldert Gerbertsen being at his house to settle accounts with him, there came to the said house Baefien Pietersen, the wife of Ulderick Kleyn, who dunned him about some debts in such a way that a dispute arose between them and the said Baefin Pietersen took hold of the said Eldert and called him a rascal." Vol. 2, page 75.
+ Feb. 5, 1658: "Albert Gysbertsz confirmed by oath his affidavit against Baefin Pietersen which he handed in at the request of Elbert Gerbertsen." Vol. 2, page 98.
+ Feb. 12, 1658: Baefjen Pietersen brought a suit against "Albert, wheelwright"; Rebecca de Trucx; Geertruy Feckmans; "the wife of Albert, the wheelwright"; and Grietjen Brughmans. The defendants defaulted. The nature of the case is not stated but it undoubtedly had something to do with the previous case. Vol. 2, page 101.
+ Feb. 19, 1658: The Baefjen Pietersen case again but Albert’s name was dropped from the list of defendants. However, "the wife of Albert, the wheelwright" still appeared. The defendants defaulted again. No details are provided. Vol. 2, page 102.
+ Feb. 19, 1658: "Harmen Jacobsen, plaintiff, against Albert Gysbertsen, defendant. The plaintiff demands payment of the balance of the purchase price of a house and lot which he sold to the defendant. The defendant says that the plaintiff did not deliver the whole of the lot. The court orders that the lot shall be viewed by their honors." Vol. 2, pages 102-103.
+ May 14, 1658: "Jan van Hoesem, plaintiff, against Albert, the wheelwright, defendant. The plaintiff demands payment of the balance of 113 schepels of wheat, according to a contract which they had with each other at the rate of 3 schepels of wheat for one beaver, of which 75 shepels have been paid for, so that there is still due the plaintiff 38 schepels of wheat. The defendant not being able to deny his signature, he, the defendant, is ordered by the court to pay the plaintiff the remaining 38 schepels of wheat within the space of six weeks." Vol. 2, page 112.
+ July 15, 1659: Albert, the wheelwright brought an unspecified case against Willem Brouwer, who defaulted. Vol. 2, page 207.
+ Oct. 28, 1659: "Albert Gysbertsen, plaintiff, against Lambert van Valckenborgh, defendant. Case put over until the next court day, when the parties are to produce evidence." The nature of the case is not specified and no mention appears in later records. Vol. 2, page 225.
+ June 8, 1660: "Albert Gysbertsen, plaintiff, against Maria Goosens, defendant. The plaintiff says that the defendant called him a thief and demands reparation of honor. The defendant denies that she said it. The parties are ordered to appear on the next court day." Vol. 2, page 259.
+ June 30, 1660: "Albert Gysbertsen, plaintiff, against Maria Goosens, defendant. The plaintiff demands reparation of character as the defendant called the plaintiff a thief. The defendant denies that she said it, as far as she knows, but on the contrary alleges that the plaintiff called her a whore, a pig and a church thief. The plaintiff produces an affidavit of two witnesses. The honorable court orders the defendant to produce her witnesses on the next court day." Vol. 2, page 271.
+ July 13, 1660: "Albert Gysbertsen, plaintiff, against Maria Goosens, defendant." Maria Goosens defaulted. "The honorable court having seen that the defendant does not appear, orders the defendant to produce her evidence on the next court day on pain of being deprived of her right." Vol. 2, page 274.
+ Aug. 3, 1660: "Albert Gysbertsen, plaintiff, against Maria Goosens, defendant." Maria Goosens defaulted a second time. Vol. 2, page 288.
+ Dec. 21, 1660: "Albert Gysbertsen, plaintiff, against Maria Goosens, defendant. The plaintiff demands reparation of honor for slander, to wit, because the defendant said that he had stolen a chest with goods at the Manhattans. The defendant denies that she said this and declares that she has nothing to say against the plaintiff’s honor or virtue, although the plaintiff called her a whore. The honorable court, having heard the parties and seeing that the defendant can not prove her accusations against the plaintiff and declares that she has nothing to say against the plaintiff, condemns the defendant for her abuse to pay a fine of six guilders for the benefit of the poor and the costs of the trial, forbidding her to utter slander again, on pain of greater fine." Vol. 2, page 307.
.
"New York Historical Manuscripts: Dutch; Kingston Papers," translated by Dingman Versteeg, edited by Peter R. Christoph, Kenneith Scott and Kenn Stryker-Rodda Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., Baltimore, 1976.
+ Feb. 7, 1662: "Henrick Cornelissen, plaintiff, demands from Albert Gysbertsen payment of the quantity of four and half schepels of oats for wages earned. The defendant admits owing the amount sued for, and promises to pay within fourteen days, at the option of the plaintiff." Cornelissen also sued two others over debts that day. Vol. 1, page 6-17.
+ Feb. 14, 1662: "Albert Gysbertsen, plaintiff, demands from Aert Jacobsen payment of the value of three beavers, wages earned for making a plough. The defendant answers he owes no more than two beavers and half. The Commissaries find that plaintiff is entitled to his full wages, and thereupon defendant is ordered to satisfy the plaintiff." Vol. 1, page 19.
+ April 18, 1662: "The Schout, as plaintiff, vs. Albert Gysterse. The first default." The nature of this case is not described and it does not seem to be brought up again. Vol. 1, page 30.
+ May 1662: "In the matter of the elections, the Schout and Commissaries have decided to nominate the following persons to govern us hereafter, subject to the approval of the Very Noble Honorable Lord Director General and the Lord High Councillors: Thomas Chambers, Jan Willemse, Tjirick Classen de Wit, Albert Gysbertsen, Aert Jacobsen.
"The Noble Lord Director General and High Councillor Gerret Deckert were this day present. The Lords Director General and Councillor continued Evert Pels and Aldert Heymanse Roose as Commissaries, and from the nominees above mentioned appointed Albert Gysbertsen and Tjirick Classen deWit.
"Below stood, April 27, Ao. 1662, Pieter Stuyvesant.
"On May 3, the newly appointed Commissaries took their oaths before the Schout and the old Commissaries, and were installed into office by order of the Noble Lord Director General and the Lord Councillor Gerrit Decker, who were here present." Vol. 1, pages 32-33. [Gysbert sat on the court until June 1664.]
+ Nov. 14, 1662: "Evert Prys, plaintiff, vs. Albert Gysbertsen, defendant. Plaintiff demands payment of the amount of twenty-five and one-half schepels of wheat, and also twenty-one gldrs., heavy money, for wages earned. Defendant Albert Gysbertsen admits owning the above mentioned debt. The Schout and Commissaries order defendant to pay within six weeks." Vol. 1, page 42.
+ Nov. 28, 1662: "Poulus Martense, plaintiff, demands payment of eighteen schepels of wheat for wages earned. Albert Gysbertsen, defendant, admits the debt. The Court orders defendant to pay the amount claimed." Vol. 1, page 44.
+ Nov. 28, 1662: "Barent Gerretsen, plaintiff, vs. Albert Gysbertsen, defendant. Plaintiff demands from defendant payment of the amount of ten schepels of oats, nine and one-half schepels of wheat, and forty-six gldrs. Zeewant. Defendant admits the debt. The Schout and Commissaries order defendant to pay." Vol. 1, page 44.
+ Nov. 28, 1662: "Christian Nissen romp, plaintiff, vs. Albert Gysbertsen, defendant. Plaintiff demands from defendant payment of the amount of twenty schepels of oats, as per assignment, by which defendant engaged to pay for Mathys Roeloofsen the money due for an anker of brandy delivered to the latter. Defendant admits the debt, requests time or to be allowed to pay at the garrison. The Court orders defendant to pay within six weeks." Vol. 1, page 46.
+ March 6, 1663: "We, the undersigned, Aldert Heymanse Roose, Commissary and Elder of the village of Wildtwyck, and Albert Gysberse, Commissary and Deacon of said village, make known that before us appeared the worthy Evert Pels, inhabitant of the village of Wildtwyck, who acknowledged that he actually and in good faith borrowed … one thousand gldrs., in corn." Vol. 1, page 64.
+ July 24, 1663: "Albert Gysbertsen, plaintiff, vs. Aert Martensen Doorn, defendant. Albert Gysbertsen says that defendant caused plaintiff’s pig to be killed, and presents a certificate to this effect. Defendant answers that he does not know whether it was plaintiff’s pig, and offers to pay the owner therefor. The Commissaries, having heard defendant’s confession, order him to deposit with the Court the quantity of six schepels of wheat, for the benefit of him who shall be found to be the lawful owner, or otherwise the Court will dispose of it as it may see fit." Vol. 1, pages 71-72.
+ Sept. 18, 1663: "The Court further resolves that it will administer the property of persons who were killed during the troubles of June 7 last, leaving no relatives. Their names are: Willem Jansen Seba, servant; Hendrick Jansen Looman, brewer’s helper; Dirrick Willemsen, inhabitant. The court appoints as administrators, Albert Gysbertsen and Tjerck Classen de Wit, both Commissaries, with orders to immediately inventory all the property of said deceased, and to administer the same until further order, or claims by nearest relatives or creditors." Vol. 1, page 74
+ Oct. 9, 1663: "Roelof Swartwout, Schout, plaintiff, vs. Aert Jacbosen, defendant. Plaintiff complains to this Court that defendant said that the Lord God would some time avenge himself upon the Lords who are here on the bench. Defendant does not deny having said so, and the Commissaries Albert Gysbertsen and Gysbert van Imborch also confirm that they heard him say so, once at the house of Schout Roelof Swartwout, and once at the bridge. The Court of this place orders defendant to submit, at its next session, his reasons for saying that revenge should be called down upon it." This case falls between two others in which Swartwout brought charges against Jacobsen. In the first, Jacobsen and his family were fined for violating the order "that no one should venture out to mow without consent and a proper convoy," which was designed to protect workers from attack by Native Americans. In the third case, Jacobsen was charged with "being a desecrater of the Sabbath, he having on that day taken a load of beer, and that, not withstanding the seizure, the defendants fetched the wagon and beer to his house." Vol. 1, page 79.
+ Oct. 23, 1663: "Tjerck Claesen deWit and Albert Gysbertsen, curators of the estate left by Hendrick Looman, having summoned Juriaen Westphael before the Honorable Court here, the question was put to him, Juriaen Westphael, whether he knows any more about the estate left by said deceased than is shown by the inventory. Whereupon the aforenamed Juriaen Westphael declares, upon his word as a man, that he knows no more, unless perhaps that, among the effects of Jan Albertsen, there were uppers for two pairs of shoes." Vol. 1, page 91
+Oct. 23, 1663: "Roelof Swartwout, Schout, plaintiff, vs. Albert Heymans, defendant. Plaintiff enters suit against defendant on a complaint of the Commissaries, Tjerck Claesen, Albert Guysbertsen and Gysbert van Imbroch, that defendant publicly accused them of being deceitful in carrying out their ordinances, and that they did not do justice in accordance therewith. Defendant says, that the Court did not act in accordance with the wording of the ordinance, and demands a copy of the record herein. The Honorable Court orders Tjerck Claesen, Albert Gysbertsen and Gysbert van Imbroch, at its next session, to furnish proof of the foregoing complaint, in conformity with their own statement." Vol. 1, page 92.
+ Nov. 20, 1663: "The Schout, Roelof Swartwout, presents this complaint against Tjerck Claesen de Wit, reading, according to his understanding, as follows: Whereas, Aeltje Wygerts and Albert Gysbertsen having complained to me that on November 13, Tjerck Claesen, armed with a drawn knife, opening quarreled in his house, acting as if he wished to kill every man, woman and child, I therefore, on this complaint, inform the Court of the matter, and also decide to exclude him for the present from the Bench, until he shall have cleared himself of the charge, and shall have been declared cleared by the Honorable Court. The advice of the Commissaries is requested herein. The Honorable Court orders that, whereas, Tjerck Claesen de Wit has already amicably settled the above matter with his accuser. Albert Gysbertsen, and they have come to an agreement regarding it, he shall remain away from the Bench until he shall have settled and adjusted this matter with the Schout." Vol. 1, page 103.
+ Nov. 20, 1663: "Tjerck Claesen de Wit, plaintiff, vs. Albert Gysbertsen, defendant. Plaintiff demands that defendant, on his default of payment for land sold him, return the land, the time for payment having expired in the month of April, 1663. Defendant replies that plaintiff has not delivered a deed of land to him, and that he will pay plaintiff after the deed has been executed to him, as he has made part payment thereon to the plaintiff. The Honorable Court orders defendant to pay plaintiff the remainder of the money due for the land, plaintiff to deliver to defendant a perfect deed and conveyance of the land." Vol. 1, page 104.
+ Dec. 4, 1663: "Tjerck Claesen de Wit, appearing before the Honorable Court, requests that justice be done him in his case against Albert Gysbertsen, and that therefore his appeal from the said judgment rendered November 20, last, be entered. The Honorable Court resolves, after plaintiff requested permission to appear and had had his opponent, Albert Gysbertsen, summoned to appear before the Court, as shown by the Court Messenger’s records, that plaintiff’s request be refused, for the reasons heretofore mentioned, in that he is not willing to do the proper thing about the Court room, for which he himself voted, and that he has forbidden several parties summoned by him, to appear with him before the Honorable Court, and also because he himself has neglected the appeal." page 107. This record refers to de Wit’s efforts earlier in the day’s session to avoid being punished for drawing his knife on Albert Gysbertsen. The schout had a certificate from witnesses that he wished to admit as evidence. However, de Wit managed to stall case and prompt a delay with a string of procedural demands. This obviously irked the court and prompted it to reject his case in the property dispute.
+ Dec. 4, 1663: "Gysbert van Imborch, plaintiff, vs. Albert Gysbertsen, defendant. Plaintiff produces an account against defendant for the sum of one hundred and ninety-eight gldrs. in zeewant. Defendant admits the debt, and says he is willing to pay, and requests time. Whereas, plaintiff refuses time for payment, defendant is ordered to satisfy him." Vol. 1, page 105.
+ Dec. 18, 1663: "Henderick Jochemsen, plaintiff, vs. Albert Gysbertsen, defendant. Absent. Default." Vol. 1, page 110.
+ Jan. 29, 1664: "The Same, plaintiff, vs. Jan Jansen van Oosterhout, defendant. Plaintiff demands from defendant ten guilders, heavy money, being the balance of the minister’s salary for the year 1661. Defendant admits the debt, and says that Albert Gysbertsen undertook to pay the same for him in the year 1661." Vol. 1, page 119.
+ Jan. 29, 1664: "Hendrick Jochemsen, plaintiff, vs. Albert Gysbertsen, defendant. Plaintiff presents an account against defendant for forty-four guilders, two stivers, in light money, for the wages of, and expenses incurred by, his son, and for sixty schepels of oats on account of Frans Pieterse, which he attached March 28, 1662. Defendant admits the debt. The Honorable Court orders defendants to pay plaintiff the above amount." Vol. 1, page 122.
+ Feb. 12, 1664: "The Same [Mattheus Capito, Provisional Schout], plaintiff, vs. Jan Broersen, defendant. Plaintiff demands from defendant the sum of twenty guilders, heavy money, being the balance for the minister’s salary for the years 1661 and 1662. Defendant admits the debt, but says that Albert Gysbertsen undertook to pay ten guilders, heavy money, in 1661. He further says he is not able to pay this year. The Honorable Court orders the defendant to pay the aforesaid demand, and that he may commence suit against Albert Gysbertsen on his claim." Vol. 1, page 124-125.
+ Feb. 26, 1664: "Albert Gysbertsen, plaintiff, vs. Coenrad Ham, defendant. Absent. Default." Vol. 1, page 128.
+ April 7, 1664: A horse named Swartje (the Black), belonging to Aert Pietersen Tack, was auctioned "and Tjerck Claesen DeWit became purchaser for 200 gldrs. in wheat, and furnishes as sureties Albert Gysbertsen and Mattys Roelofsen, who each as principal besides the purchaser, have subscribed to the present with their own hand." Vol. 2, page 537-538.
+ April 8, 1664: "On this April 8 of the year 1664 appeared before me, Matheus Capito, secretary of the village of Wildwyck, in the presence of the afternamed witnesses, the worthy Albert Gysbertsen, resident of Wildwyck, who declares having received and accepted of Tjerck Claesen DeWit a horse on similar conditions of purchase as he, Tjerck Claesen DeWit, bought said horse yesterday being April 7 at Lord’s execution, viz., for 200 gldrs. of wheat, with the stiver money of the same, to be paid at such times and installments to the vendue master, and which horse he Albert Gysbertsen immediately receives and accepts of the aforesaid Tjerck Claesen DeWit. And for the purpose of living up to the aforesaid condition of purchase he, Albert Gysbertsen, by the present binds his person and goods, personal and real, present and future, none excepted, submitting the same to the compulsion of all courts and judges. In witness whereof he, Albert Gysbertsen, has subscribed to the present with his own hands, besides Cornelis Barentsen Slecht and Mattys Roelofsen as witnesses, invited and requested for this purpose. Done at Wildwyck on the day and in the year mentioned above, (signed) The mark of A Albert Gysbertsen, himself; Cornelis Barentsen Slecht; the mark of Mattys Roelofsen. In my presence, to which certifies (signed) Mattheus Capito, Secretary." Vol. 2, page 538.
+ May 9, 1664: "Conditions and terms whereupon by Lord’s execution all kinds of farming implements and some furniture of Cornelis Barentsen Slecht will be sold to the highest bidder by Johanna DeLaet, wife of Jeronimus Ebbing. … Albert Gysbertsen, two old scythes, a pivot, a horse collar, 3 gldrs, 10 st. … Albert Gysbertsen, five halters, 3 gldrs. … Tjerck Claesen has bought from the effects 26 gldrs. worth, and furnishes for sureties Albert Gysbertsen and Henderick Jochemsen (signed) The mark A of Albert Gysbertsen and Hendrick Jochemsz. Albert Gysbertsen bought from the effects 6-10 gldrs. worth, and furnishes as sureties Tjerck Claesen and Hendrick Jochemsz. … Aert Martensen Doorn has bought from the effects 66-10 gldrs. worth and furnishes as sureties Tjerck Claessen and Albert Gysbertsen. (Signed) Tierck Claszen DeWitt, the mark A of Albert Gysbertsen." Vol. 2, page 539.
+ June 24, 1664: "Roelof Swartwout, Schout, plaintiff, vs. Albert Gysbertsen, defendant. Paintiff requests that defendant, as in duty bound, shall testify to the truth before the Honorable Court, with reference to the differences between plaintiff and Tjerck Claesen deWit, regarding the pasturing of plaintiff’s cows, concerning which defendant testifies and declares that he knows that Tjerck Claesen deWit promised to pasture two cows for plaintiff, for which plaintiff was not to advance Tjerck Claesen any money." Vol. 1, page 154-155.
+ June 24, 1664: "Albert Gysbertsen requests that he be permitted to dig a saw pit in front of his lot. The Honorable Court grants petitioner’s request, upon condition that he cover the saw-pit every evening so that no accident may occur therefrom to man or beast, and that he fill it up before harvest time." Vol. 1, page 155.
+ July 22, 1664: "Juriaen Westphael, plaintiff, vs. Tjerck Claesen deWit, and Albert Gysbertsen, defendants. Plaintiff demands a balance of one hundred and twenty-seven and one-half schepels of wheat from defendants as curators of the estate of Henderick Jansen Looman, appointed by the Honorable Court. Defendants refer to their account book, exhibited to the Honorable Court, wherefrom it appears that there are more creditors, and the estate apparently will be in debt. The Honorable Court decides that plaintiff shall receive the whole of this claim relating to the horse, and that for the balance of his account he must share with the other creditors." Vol. 1, page 158.
+ July 22, 1664: "Roelof Swartwout, plaintiff, vs. Albert Gysbertsen, defendant. Plaintiff still demands a fine from defendant for violating the ordinance with reference to not going out to plough or work without a convoy. Defendant says he is ready to prove that he asked Ensign Niessen for a convoy, which the latter promised but did not send. The case is adjourned to the next session." Vol. 1, page 159.
+ Oct. 7, 1664: "The young mare is offered for sale and bidders are: Albert Gysbertsen, 100 gldrs. … Aert Jacobsen became purchaser for 238 gldrs. … A heifer 2½ years old was offered for sale and bidders were: Henderick Martensen, 40 gldrs. This was increased by Hend. Cornelissen, Lyndraejer, to 60 gldrs., and by Albert Gysbertsen to 80 gldrs., and by Jan Jansen Van Oosterhout to 90 gldrs. These 90 gldrs. remain fixed, and are increased [by the auctioneer] with 50 gldrs. which are bid down to 10 gldrs., and Albert Gysbertsen became purchaser for 100 gldrs." Vol. 2, page 544.
+ Nov. 18, 1664: " Tjerck Claesen De Wit, Plainfiff vs. Aeltje Wygerts, Defendant. Plaintiff shows a bill of sale of a horse bought by her husband, Albert Gysbertsen, during his lifetime from plaintiff for 200 gldrs. in wheat to be paid at such times and in such payments to the vendue-master as he has bought it by Lord’s execution on April 7, 1664. Defendant admits the debt and offers to pay 100 sch. Of oats, provisionally, and the balance from the future next year’s (1665) crop, or else to return the horse, and is willing to pay plaintiff for the use of said horse. Plaintiff replies not to be satisfied with aforementioned offer. The hon. court orders defendant to pay plaintiff as per contract. Vol. 1, page 175-176.
+ Dec. 18, 1664: "We, the undersigned, Gysbert Van Imbroch and Jan Willemsen Hoochteylingh, Scheepenen of the village of Wildwyck, make known and know that there appeared before us the worthy Aeltje Wygerts, widow of Albert Gysbertsen, deceased, who declares that her husband Albert Gysbertsen, deceased, bought during his lifetime from the estate of Aert Pietersen Tack, a heifer for the amount of 100 aldrs. heavy money, for which amount of 100 gldrs. heavy money the appearer has been referred to and promises to pay to Swerus Teunissen, inhabitant of the colony of Rensselaerswyck, in good merchantable winter wheat with the interest of the same, being ten percent during the time of one current year, commencing Nov. 18, 1664, and ending on Nov. 18, 1665, the schepel at three gldrs. For which amount of 100 gldrs. with the current interest of the same, she appearer, specially mortgages for the purpose of precisely, the above stipulated period, paying Swerus Teunissen aforementioned, the crop of all the corn which, by God’s blessing, shall, in the coming year 1665, be brought in from her land, and further in general her person and further goods, personal and real estate, present and future, none excepted, submitting the same to the jurisdiction of all courts and judges. And hereby renounces all exceptions and pretexts which might in any way be contrary to the present, she, appearer, has besides ourselves, sign the present with her own hand. Given at Wildwyck this December 18, 1664. Aeltien Wychersen, Gysbert Van Imbroch, Jan Willemsen Hoochteylingh." Vol. 1, page 191.
+ Feb. 17, 1665: "Juriaen Westphael, Plaintiff, vs. Tjerck Claesen DeWit, Defendant. Plaintiff demands payment coming to him from the estate of Henderick Jansen Looman. Defendant says that at Fort Orange there are yet some debts standing out an don that account said estate cannot be liquidated. And once more requests to be discharged from his office of curator because he is along and his partner Albert Gysbertsen has died. Defendant’s request to be relieved from the office of curator of [the estate of] Henderick Jansen Looman and Willem Jansen Seba is granted on account of the death of his partner and because the liquidation does not properly take place and the estate is not administered to the satisfaction of the creditors, and in his place and appointed Jacob Burhans and Aert Jacobsen, and defendant is ordered to transfer the accounts, proofs and that which is left to the aforenamed persons." Vol. 1, page 214-215.
+ March 9, 1665: "Pieter Hillebrants, Plaintiff, vs. Tjerck Claesen De Wit, Defendant. Roelof Swartwout in the place of Pieter Hillebrants, as attorney for Aeltje Wygerts, last widow of Albert Gysbertsen, deceased, and at present wife of the aforesaid Pieter Hillebrants, requests conveyance and transfer by defendant of 20 morgens of arable land sold to the aforesaid widow’s late husband Albert Gysbertsen, deceased, according to deed and obligation, on account of change of government, either present or future. Defendant answers to be willing to make out the deed as soon as navigation is again open, because he himself must yet receive a deed of Jeronimus Ebbingh. And further requests the full payment of a sold horse, being a balance of 100 gldrs. in grain, and further demands 14 sch. of wheat for damage sustained through the attachment of his horse, bought from the estate of Aert Pietersen Tack at the Lord’s execution, which payment Albert Gysbertsen should have made for him, as is show by the contract. Plaintiff replies to defendant’s claim and shows a copy from the minutes dated Nov. 25, 1664, where Tjerck Claesen as plaintiff requested execution in regard to the above demand for payment for the horse, and the same was delayed on account of nonconveyance of the bought and paid for land, and further says notwithstanding said claim for conveyance to be willing to pay, and has shown a specification of the said [claim] amounting to 205 gldrs. 5 st. Defendant answers and says to be satisfied with what may be paid after sufficient proof and yet demands the balance and 14 sch. of wheat for costs. The hon. court, having heard parties, decides, and orders defendant to make an effective conveyance and delivery of the land sold to plaintiff, as soon as navigation is again open, or by default, to make good the damage and [loss of] interest which plaintiff might suffer on account of the same. And further in regard to plaintiff’s presentation to pay for the horse to defendant, parties are ordered to settle concerning the difference. As to the costs, 14 sch. of wheat, demanded by defendant, it is decided, whereas parties have been mutually negligent in living up to their contracts, therefore said costs shall be mutually born one half by each." Vol. 1, page 282.
+ March 20, 1665: "In the name of the Lord Amen. Be it known by the contents of this present instrument that in the year 1665, on the 20th day of the month of March, N.S., there appeared before me, Mattheus Capito, Secretary of the village of Wildwyck, Pieter Hillebrants, young man, accompanied by his mother, Femmetje Alberts, party of the first part, and Aeltje Wygerts, widow of Albert Gysbertsen [In the margin stood: accompanied by Roeloff Hendericks, her son-in-law], part of the second part, who have in this following manner stipulated these marriage conditions, viz., that for the glory of God said Pieter Hillebrants and Aeltje Wygerts shall be obliged to conclude their respective marriage here in accordance with the canons of the reformed religion; 2) that the said married people shall confer and bring together all their estate real and personal of whatever nature they shall be, to be used by them in community, according to the customs of Holland, with the exception that the bride Aeltje Wygerts in the presence of the hon. Heer Willem Beekman, schout, and Jan Willemsen Hoocheylingh, commissary, in the capacity of orphan masters, sets apart for each of her children 50 gldrs. heavy money at three gldrs. per sch. winter wheat, viz., for Aeltje and Jan, children of Lubbert Jansen, and for Lysbet and Gysbert, children of Albert Gysbertsen, for which amount of 50 gldrs. heavy money for every respective child, she, Aeltje Wygerts, mortgages her house and land situated under [the jurisdiction of] the village of Wildwyck. It is also stipulated by the present with the approval of the aforesaid respective married people [sic] that Roelof Swartwout and Jan Willemsen Hoochteylingh, both residents here, shall be guardians of said children which the aforesaid members of the court, in their capacity of orphan masters, have approved. It was also stipulated that the aforesaid bride shall have her children instructed in reading and writing, and, if possible, shall have them learn a trade. It was further stipulated that, in case of demise of one or the other of them, all of the conferred and acquired estate during their married life shall be parted in half and divided. With which above condition the respective parties have promised to comply, binding their persons and goods, personal and real estate, present and future, submitting the same to the jurisdiction of all judges and courts. Done at Wildwyck on the day and in the year mentioned above. (Signed) Pieter Hillebrants, Aeltien Hybersen, the mark + of Femmetje Alberts, Roelof Hendericks, Wilh. Beeckman, Jan Willemsen Hoochteylingh, Roelof Swartwout. Known to me, (Signed) Mattheus Capito, Secretary." pages 557-558. Note: The [sic] appears in the transcript because this was a prenuptial agreement.
+ Feb. 27, 1666: "We, the undersigned, Evert Pels and Jan Joosten, schepenen of the village of Wildwyck, make known and know that before us there has appeared the worthy Pieter Hillebrants, resident of said village of Wildwyck, who declares to owe to the worthy Swerus Teunissen, resident of Rentselaerswyck a sum of 100 gldrs. heavy money to be paid in winter wheat at three gldrs. per sch., originating from the purchase of a heifer, bought by his predecessor, the deceased Albert Gysbertsen from the estate of Aert Pietersen Tack. Which aforesaid amount of 100 gldrs. he, the appearer, agrees to pay to the aforesaid Swerus Teunissen or his attorney in the month of October next of this belowmentioned year 1666, precisely, with the interest of the same, being ten percent annually, commencing on Nov. 18 of the year 1664." Vol. 2, page 589.
+ Feb. 18, 1672/3: "Cornelis Wynkoop, Plaintiff, vs. Willem Montagne, Defendant. Plaintiff demands by virtue of a mortgage, dated May 1, 1664, the interest up to date, because the interest and the mortgage have not been set aside. Defendants, by virtue of a power of attorney, says that no interest is due, because the mortgage only ran four years. The hon. court decides, whereas Cornelis Wynkoop at the expiration of the four years did not legally enforce the payment of the interest on the mortgage given to Albert Gysbertsen by said Wynkoop, therefore he, Wynkoop, will lose the further interest and cannot claim it, the more so because the mortgage would not had to be renewed so that he might be entitled to claim anything." Vol. 2, page 492-493.
+ March 8, 1674/5: "Roelof Swartwout and Jan Willemsen, guardians of the children of Albert Gysbertsen, deceased, beside the mother of the children, request to be permitted to apportion to the children their patrimonial inheritance, because the same have attained their majority except Jan, who is one year short of it. The hon. court allows the same to take place." Vol. 2, page 528.
+ April 9/19, 1667: "On this April 9/19, 1667, appeared before me, Mattheus Capito, Secretary of the village of Wildwyck, and the belownamed witnesses Tjerck Claesen De Witt, who promises by the present to grant to Swerus Teunissen a conveyance for the land bought by said Swerus Teunissen of Pieter Hillebrants, successor of the deceased Albert Gysbertsen. Said land is situated under the village of Wildwyck and was sold by him, the appearer, to the deceased Albert Gysbertsen, and to grant the same to the aforesaid Swerus Teunissen free and unencumbered, save the Lord’s rights, within two months after date, under obligations as per law. Without any suspicion of craft he, the appearer, besides Jan Joosten and Roelof Swartwout, was witnesses invited and requested for the purpose, has signed the present with his own hand at Wildwyck on the day and in the year named before. (Signed) Jan Joosten, Roelof Swartwout, Tierck Claszen De Witt. In my presence, (signed) Mattheus Capito, Sectretary." Vol. 2, page 563.
Items relating to Aeltje Wygerts
+ Nov. 25, 1664: "Tjerck Claesen De Wit requests execution of the judgment dated Nov. 18, 1664, against Aeltje Wygerts. The hon. court having seen the summons sent to Aeltje Wygerts, decides that Tierck Claesen shall first deliver to Aeltje Wygerts the deed of the land as per contract of the same dated Dec. 13, 1663, having been shown to the court by Roelof Swartwout as attorney of Aeltje Wygerts, aforenamed." Vol. 1, pages 180-181.
+ Dec. 2, 1664: "Tomas Harmensen, Plaintiff, vs. Aeltje Wygerts. Absent Default." Vol. 1, page 182.
+ Dec. 9, 1664: "Henderick Cornelissen, Plaintiff, vs. Pieter Hillebrants, Defendant. Absent. Default.
"Henderick Cornelissen, Plaintiff, vs. Aeltje Wygerts, Defendant. Absent, sick." [Previous to these two cases, Cornelissen filed a suit against Aert Jacobsen, who was also in default. In a fourth case listed just after Aeltje’s, he filed a suit against Aert Martensen Doorn to collect a debt.] Vol. 1, page 185.
+ March 3, 1665: Evert Pels, curator of the estate of Jan Albertsen Van Steenwyck, and Henderick Jochemsen, guardian, vs. "Aeltje Wygerts, Defendants. Plaintiffs demand of defendant 26 gldrs. light money, books debt, with the interest and costs of the same. Defendant admits the debts and says that she will do her best to pay. The hon. court ordered defendant to satisfy plaintiffs for the above demand with the interest and the costs of the same." [This was one of several cases brought by these plaintiffs that day against people who owed the estate money.] Vol. 1, 224.
+ March 3/13, 1667/8: "Magdaleen Dircx, Plaintiff, vs. Catryn Matys, Defendant. Plaintiff says that a few days ago she entered the house of Arent Teunissen, where she and defendant entered into a conversation concerning a certain comet, and about the ideas of astrologers concerning said comet, whereupon defendant said, ‘if he could say who stole your linen, then he must be able to say something else,’ and defendants further said, ‘who should have stolen chickens and boards,’ whereupon I, plaintiff, answered, ‘Your husband has stolen a board of our cool-house and your sister a pocket handkerchief of my husband.’ Defendant answers and says that at the house of Aert Teunissen they had a conversation about astrologers, and the words were uttered, ‘If he was able to say that Wychert had stolen linen, then he was able to say others things,’ whereupon plaintiff answered, ‘Take me for the person,’ with further insinuations about pocket handkerchief and boards, and I deny that I mentioned [or named] plaintiff, but said in a general way: ‘Those stealing chickens and boards, are they not thieves? and those carrying handkerchiefs stolen of Mrs. Blom?’
"Henry Palingh, having been summoned at the request of Magdaleen Dircs, plaintiff requests that he shall be asked whence he got the linen which was stolen last winter out of the garden. Hendk. Palingh answers having found the linen in his own garden, but does not know who took it there. Further says somebody wearing Jan Jansen’s shoes has taken it from plaintiff’s garden. Jan Jansen appearing in the session demands proof of Magdaleen Dircx that he stole a board of her cool-house and made a wheel-barrow of the same, as plaintiff says. The hon. court orders that parties shall mutually prove their assertions and accusations at the next session of the court, as also Hend. Palingh’s assertion concerning Jan Jansen Van Amersfoot." Vol. 2, page 397.
+ Nov. 9, 1666: "On this November 9, N.S., 1666, appeared before me, Mattheus Capito, Secretary of the village of Wildwyck, and the belownamed witnesses, Pieter Hillebrants, assisted with his wife, Aeltje Wygerts, of the first part, and Swerus Teunessen, of the second part, who declare having agreed with each other upon the following condition: Pieter Hillebrants declares having sold and Swerus Teunissen having bought of the beforenamed grantor a farm situated under the village of Wildwyck between the land of Tjerck Claesen DeWit and the widow of the deceased Aert Jacobsen, 20 morgens in extent with such sowing of winter wheat as the grantee has just been shown, beside the dwelling, barn and tack and the annexed lot situated in the village of Wildwyck between the lots of Roelof Hendericksen and the hon Heer Petrus Stuyvesant, with such passive and active servitudes and rights as the aforesaid grantor is possessing the same up to date, all considering the Lord’s rights, besides a plow with its equipment and a wagon, in good condition, but without iron work. For which aforeside farm, house barn, stack and annexed lot, besides the said plow and wagon, the grantor promises to pay the beforementioned grantor a quantity of 800 sch. of winter wheat or other grain at the prices of said wheat in three installments or payments. The first installment shall become due in the following winter of the terminating year 1667, being a just third portion of the aforesaid amount, the second installment, also a just third part, in the winter of the passing year 1668, and the third or last installment in the winter of the closing year 1669. The grantor also promises to convey to the aforesaid grantee said farm, house and lot with what has been further named, after the receipt of the last installment, free and unencumbered, excepting the Lord’s rights, but with this understanding that the grantee shall be entitled to immediately take possession of said house and lot, and what belongs to it, besides of the land. And the respective appearers promise to sincerely comply with the present, pledging their persons and estate, movable and immovable, present and future, none excepted, submitting them to all courts and judges. On which account said appearers have subscribed to the present with their own hand, besides Cornelis Barentsen Slecht and Arieaen Van Ilpendam as witnesses requested and invited for the purpose at Wildwyck on the day and in the year named before. (Signed) Pieter Hilbrant, Sweerus Toonussen Van Velsen, Adriaen Van Ilpendam, Cornelis Barents Slecht. In my presense, (signed) Mattheus Capito, Secretary." Vol. 2, page 620.
+ March 24, 1673: "Appeared before us the undersigned commissaries, Cornelis Wyncoop and Joost Adriaensen, commissaries of the hon. court at Kingston, Pieter Hillebrantsen, residing at Marbleton, who acknowledges to honestly and actually owe Mr. Balthasar Bayard an amount of 393 gldrs nine st. in good clear winter wheat at six gldrs. per sch. … (Signed) this is the mark P of Pieter Hillebrandts, by himself." Vol. 2, page 732.
"Ulster County, N.Y., Probate Records," vol. 1, by Gustave Anjou, 1906.
+ Dec. 18, 1664: "Aeltje Wygert, widow of Albert Gysbertsen, deceased, appears before Gysbert Van Imbrock, Jan Willemsen Hoochteylingh, Scheepens, about a heifer which her husband had bought from the estate of Aert Pietersen Tack." Page 22.
+ March 20, 1665: "In the name of the Lord, Amen. Be it known by these, that on March 20, 1665, N.S., appears before Mattheus Capito, Secretary of Wildwyck, Pieter Hillebrants, young man, accompanied by his mother, Femmetje Alberts, and Aeltje Wygerts, widow of Albert Gysbertsen, accompanied by Roeloff Hendericks, her son-in-law, who in this manner have stipulated these marriage condition. 1. The marriage to be concluded in accordance with the canons of the reformed religion. 2. All the property, belonging to either party, to be used in common, in accordance with the custom of Holland, with the exception that the bride sets apart for each of her children 50 guilders heavy money, viz. for Aeltje and Jan, children of Lubbert Jansen, and for Lysbet and Gysbert, children of Albert Gysbertsen. Roeloff Swartwout and Jan Willemse Hoochteylingh to be appointed guardians over said children, who are to be instructed in reading, writing, and, if possible, learn a trade. In case of death of either party, the property is to be divided." Page 29.

"The Documentary History of the State of New York," by E.B. O’Callaghan, 1849, vol. 4, "Journal of the Second Esopus War," pages 39-42.
+ On June 7, 1663, the Native Americans "surprised and attacked us between the hours of 11 and 12 o’clock in the forenoon on Thursday the 7th instant. Entering in bands through all the gates, they divided and scattered themselves among all the houses and dwellings in a friendly manner, having with them a little maize and some few beans to sell to our Inhabitants, by which means they kept them within their houses, and thus went from place to place as spies to discovered our strength in men. After they had been about a short quarter of an hour within this place, some people on horseback rushed through the Mill gate from the New Village, crying out – ‘The Indians have destroyed the New Village!’ And with these words, the Indians here in this Village immediately fired a shot and made a general attack on our village from the rear, murdering our people in their houses with their axes and tomahawks, and firing on them with guns and pistols; they seized whatever women and children they could catch and carried them prisoners outside the gates, plundered the houses and set the village on fire to windward, it blowing at the time from the South. The remaining Indians commanded all the streets, firing from the corner houses which they occupied and through the curtains outside along the highways, so that some of our inhabitants, on their way to their houses to get their arms, were wounded and slain. When the flames were at their height the wind changed to the west, were it not for the which the fire would have been much more destructive. So rapidly and silently did Murder do his work that those in different parts of the village were not aware of it until those who had been wounded happened to meet each other, in which way the most of the others also had warning. The greater portion of our men were abroad at their field labors, and but few in the village. Near the mill gate were Albert Gysbertsen with two servants, and Tjerck Claesen de Witt … By these aforesaid men, most of whom had neither guns nor side arms, were the Indians, through God’s mercy, chased and put to flight on the alarm being given by the Sheriff. Capt. Thomas Chambers, who was wounded on coming in from without, issued immediate orders (with the Sheriff and Commissaries,) to secure the gates; to clear the gun and to drive out the Savages, who were still about half an hour in the village aiming at their persons, which was accordingly done. The burning of the houses, the murder and carrying off of women and children is here omitted, as these have been already communicated to your Honors on the 10th June. After these few men had been collected against the Barbarians, by degrees the others arrived who it has been stated, were abroad at their field labors, and we found ourselves when mustered in the evening, including those from the new village who took refuge amongst us, in number 69 efficient men, both qualified and unqualified. The burnt palisades were immediately replaced by new ones, and the people distributed, during the night, along the bastions and curtains to keep watch."
+ The list of those killed at Wildwyck contains 12 men, four women and two children. Four women and five children were taken prisoner. Eight men were wounded, including one who died nine days later. A dozen houses were burned. In the "New Village," which was "entirely destroyed except a new uncovered barn, one rick and a little stack of reed," three men were listed as killed while one man, eight women and 26 children were taken prisoner. Pages 42-44.

"New Netherland Connections," Vol. 4, No. 3, July 1999, "Albert Gysbertsen and Aeltje Wiggers: Progenitors of the Van Gorden/Van Gorder Family in America," by Mary E. Van Gorden, pages 57-64.
+ Much of the article relies on work by Dutch genealogist Peter Nouwt, who examined church, tax and court records from the area around Heerde, Netherlands. The town’s church records don’t begin until 1658, which is after the family had emigrated. However, court records mention the testimony of a 28-year-old Aeltken Wichgers on Oct. 21, 1650. In addition, brothers Gerrit and Aert Gijsbertsen – possibly brothers of Albert – appear in the town’s records. By 1658, Gerrit had immigrated to Fort Orange, the same settlement where Albert lived at the time. Gerrit and Aert were the sons of Gijsbert Ariensen and Kerstgen Everts. Pages 57-59.
+ "An important clue concerning when Albert and Aeltje emigrated to New Netherland can be found in a list of settlers on Staten Island, New York, who survived the Indian massacre of September 1655. The following excerpt from that record is believed to refer to Albert’s family:
"Aelbert Gysselbertsen van Heerde met syn vrou, ende vier kinder, ended eeen knecht hout sich int’fort Orangen. (Albert Gysbertsen of Heerde with his wife and four children and one man servant, dwelling at Fort Orange.)
"Dorothy A. Koenig, provided Peter Nouwt with enlightening information from another portion of this document found on page 74 of Volume 13 of ‘Documents Relating to the Colonial History of New York’:
"A closer look [at this document] shows that its full heading is ‘List of the farmers, men, women, children, male and female servants sent by Yoncker Henrick van der Capellen toe Ryssel to Staten-Island in New-Netherland in West-India [America] since May 1650 and of those who were alive after the dreadful and bloody massacre by the savages in September 1655.’ [Due to the ineptness of New Amsterdam officials following the stealing of peaches by an Indian squaw, hundreds of Indians rose up in September 1655 and killed many settlers on Staten Island and the New Jersey shore in what became known as the Peach War.] The list of settlers was reported by the wife of Captain Adriaen Post and farmer Jan Aerentsen van Heerde on 14 November 1657 [at Zutphen, Gelderland, the Netherlands]." Page 59. Brackets are in the original.
+ "Recently translated deacons’ accounts from the Dutch Reformed Church at Beverwyck show that on 22 May and 1 July 1656, ‘Albert Gisbertsen de Ramaker’ (the wheelwright) was advanced a small amount of money by the church deacons, possibly as a loan." Page 59.
+ "It appears that Albert moved his family down the Hudson River in 1661, to the region known as Esopus and to the community of Wiltwyck (which became Kingston n 1669). The Wiltwyck area provided opportunities for land ownership, which had not been possible at the patroonship Rensselaerswyck adjacent to Reverwyck.
"In 1661, there were 45 dwellings at Wiltwyck; Albert Gysbertsen’s house lot was #27. That same year residents, including Albert, were taxed for funds to build a house for the minister, Dominie Blom. That dwelling also was used as a church for several years. Wiltwyck church records tell us that Albert and Aeltje transferred their church membership for Beverwyck to Wiltwyck on 15 April 1661." Page 60.

"Baptismal and Marriage Registers of the Old Dutch Church of Kingston, Ulster County, New York, 1660-1809," transcribed and edited by Roswell R. Hoes, 1891.
+ April 3, 1665: "Pieter Hillebrantsen, j.m. of [New] Amsterdam, in Nieunederlant [New Netherlands], and Aeltje Wiggers, of Herden, in Gelderlant [Gelderland], widow of Albert Gysbersen, both resid. Here [in Wiltwyck, now Kingston]. First publication of Banns, 22 March; second, 29 March; third, 3 April." Brackets are in original. Footnotes: Herden – "The present Heerde, in Province of Gelderland, Holland, 30 miles N.N.E. or Arnhem"; Wiltwyck – "The name of the village of Wiltwyck is usually said to have been change to Kingston shortly after the surrender of the New Netherlands to the English, in 1664. The change was not made, however, until the 25 of Sept. 1669. (See Docs. Rel. to Col. Hist. Of State of N.Y., XIII, 435, and Brodhead’s Hist. of N.Y., II, 157.)" Page 501.
+ Harman, son of Gysbert Aelbertz and Rachel Roosecrans, baptized Nov. 26, 1682. Sponsors were Magdaleen Rosecrans and Leendert Cool. Page 18.
+ Pieter, son of Gysbert Albertz and Rachel Rosecrans, baptized Nov. 1, 1684. Sponsors were Aeltie Wiggertz and Pieter Hillebrantz. Page 23.
+ Magdalena, daughter of Gysbert Albertz and Rachel Roosecrans, baptized Aug. 29, 1686. Sponsors were Cornelis Switz and Maartie Cornlis. Page 26.
+ Geysberth, son of Gysberth Van Garden and Rachel Roosekrans, baptized Dec. 9, 1688. Sponsors were Henderick in ‘t Velt and Aletje in ‘t Velt. Page 32.
+ Henderik, son of Gysbert Albertsen and Rachel Harmensen, baptized Jan. 28, 1692. Sponsors were Joris Henderiksen and Aaltje Lubbertsen. Page 37.
+ Heroman, son of Gysbert Albertse and Rachel Rosekrans, baptized July 12, 1696. Sponsors were Alexander Roosekrans and Sara Roosekrans. Page 47.
+ Alexander, son of Gysbert Albertsen and Rachel Rooskrans, baptized May 29, 1698. Sponsors were Lenard Cool and Gemmetje in t’Veld. Page 53.
+ Aaltje, daughter of Gysbert Albertsen and Rachel Roosekrans, baptized Oct. 13, 1700. Sponsors were Goosen va Wagenen and Jannetje va Wagenen. Page 60.
+ Sara, daughter of Gysbert van Gerden and Rachel Roosekrans, baptized Jan. 31, 1703. Sponsors were Pieter Lamertsen and Geertruy Mattheuwse. Page 68.
+ Sara, daughter of Gysbert van Gaerden and Rachel Roosekrans, baptized Sept. 22, 1705. Sponsors were Pieter Lambertse and Geertruy Teeuwisse. Page 74.
+ Christina, daughter of Gysbert van Garden and Rachel Rosekrans, baptized Sept. 18, 1709. Sponsors were Gerrit Van Vliet and Petronella Swart. Page 87.
+ Dec. 4, 1718: "Hendrik Van Garden, j.m., born in Raysester [Rochester], and Marretjen Middag, j.d., born in Neepenag [Napanoch]. Banns registered, 16 Nov." Brackets are in original. Footnote: Neepenag – "In the present town of Wawarsing, Ulster Co." Page 535.
+ Sept. 15, 1720: "Hendrik van Garden, widower of Marretje Middag, born in Raysester [Rochester], and Elionora Dekker, j.d., born in Raysester, and both now resid. there. Banns registered, 28 Aug." Brackets are in original. Page 538.
+ Jan, son of Hendrik Van Garden and Eleonora Dekker, baptized Sept. 23, 1722. Sponsors were Jan Bovie and Catrina Montangjen. The same day, Hendrick and Eleonora acted as sponsor s for Jan and Catrina’s daughter Ester. Page 143.
+ Marretjen, daughter of Hendrik van Garden and Eleonora Dekker, baptized Aug. 22, 1725. Sponsors were Harmanus Kool and Carnelia Van Leuven. Page 158.
+ Johanna, daughter of Hendrik Van Garden and Lenora Dekker, baptized Oct. 22, 1727. Sponsors were Lambert Brink and Johanna Dekker. Page 171.
+ Nov. 5, 1699: Gysbert Albertse and Rachel Roosekrans served as sponsors at the baptism of Lysbet, daughter of Juriaan Lootman and Annetje Tyssen. Page 57.
"The Annual Report of the State Historian of the State of New York 1897," Wynkoop Hallenbeck Crawford Co., New York, 1898. Reprinted by Genealogical Publishing Co. Inc., Baltimore, 2000, page 448.
+ "1686 or 1687. … A Lest of the Tropers at Kingston. Capten Hendricks beeckman … gysbertt albertsen"

"The Rosenkrans Family in Europe and America," by Allen Rosenkrans, published in 1900, page 54.
Children of Harmen Hendricksen: "RACHEL, baptized Aug. 21, 1663; married Gysbert Van Garden, who settled about 1684 on a farm in Rochester, on the Rondout. He was the son of Albert Gysbertsen, and Aeltje Wiggers, who came to Kingston from Heerde, a Province of Gelderland prior to 1660. Gysbert’s name previous to 1684 is found in the records as Gysbert Alberts, but in a petition to the Governor, 1684, he signed his name Gysbert VanGarden, and since then he and his descendants have had the family name of VanGarden, now usually spelled VanGorden. Gysbert is said to have been a large land owner in Rochester, and as before mentioned owned, in company with Alexander Rosenkrans, a mill property on the Peterskill. He was a Trustee of Rochester 1713-16, and died priot to 1720. – ‘Church Life.’
"The children of Gysbert VanGarden and Rachel Rosenkrans were ten: Albert, who married Jannetje Vredenburg and, 1704, settled at Minissink, N.J. Harmen, baptized 1682, died young. Pieter bap. 1684, m. Margaret Dekker and moved to Shippekonk, at the "smooth rocks," in Montague, three miles from Port Jervis. Magdalena m. Jan VanKampen, Jr., of Rochester. Gysbert m. Arreantje de Lange, of Rochester. Herman died young. Herman 2nd m. Elsje Koddebek, and lived at Shippekonk, where his sons Daniel and Benjamin afterward lived. Hendrick m. Marretje Middog 2nd, Elenora Deckker and lived in Montague. Sara died young. Sara 2nd bap. 1705, m. Leendert Kool, 1723, and lived in Rochester. He afterward moved to Walpack, N.J. Christian bap Sept 18, 1709, m. Jacob VanderMarker (Vandermark)." Christian should be Christina.

"Collections of the New York Genealogical and Biographical Society, Vol. V: Minisink Valley Reformed Dutch Church Records," edited by Royden W. Vosburgh, 1913.
Walpeck Church Record.

+ Catharina, daughter of Hendrick van Garden and Eleonora Decker, baptized July 5, 1742. Sponsors were Jacobus Devoor, Eva Dingenman, his wife. Page 2.
+ Catharina, daughter of Hendrick van Garden and Eleonora Decker, baptized July 12, 1747. Sponsors were Jacobus Devoor, Eva Dingenman, his wife. Page 6.
+ Jan Van Garden, j.m., b. at Rochester, and Lisabeth Van der Merkel, j.d., b. at Rochester; both lived at Walpeck. Page 93.
+ Hendrick, son of Jan van Garden and Lisabeth Merckel, baptized March 22, 1752. Sponsors were Edward Johnson and Hanna van Garden, his wife. Page 11.
+ Marya, son of Jan van Garden and Lisabeth van der Merckel, baptized Sept. 30, 1754. Sponsors were Benjamin van der Merckel and Lisabeth Kermer. Page 14.
+ John, son of Jan van Garden and Elisabeth van de Merken, baptized April 15, 1764. No sponsors listed. Page 18.
+ Catrina, daughter of Jan van gorden and Elisabeth van de merken, baptized Aug. 14, 1766. Sponsors were frederick Edwart (?) [Evelant?], Catrina Edwart (?). Brackets and parentheses are in original. Page 20.
Minisink-Machackemeck Church Record. (Deerpark, N.Y.)
+ Hendrick Van Garden and Malletje Middagh served as sponsors at the baptism of Abraham, son of Jan Middagh and Geertje Klearwater, on Jan. 29, 1718. Page 97.
+ Lena, daughter of Henrich Van Garden and Lenora Dekker, baptized May 29, 1739. Sponsors were Willem Cool and Mareitje Koettebek. Page 100.
+ Elias, son of Jan Van Garden and Elizabeth Van De Merken, baptized Feb. 10, 1773. Sponsors were Elias Van De Merken and Jenny Chesly. Page 162.

"The Genealogical Magazine of New Jersey," vol., 62, January 1987, pages 12-19.
+ "The outbreak of the French & Indian War was heralded in New Jersey by several Indian forays into Sussex County and adjacent areas of Pennsylvania and New York. Governor Jonathan Belcher received a series of reports of settlers being killed or captured and their homesteads burned. …
"On 3 June 1757 the Legislature passed ‘An Act for the raising and maintaining One Hundred and Twenty effective men, for the Defense of the Frontiers of the Colony of New Jersey.’ … It was commanded by Capt. Richard Gardiner, a Justice of Sussex County and Agent for the East Jersey Board of Proprietors in the County. He had for some time previously been Commander of the Forces on the Frontier."
John Vangarden appears on the "Muster Ross of the Provincial Forces Commanded by Capt. Richard Gardiner on the Frontiers of New Jersey for the 8th of June to the 20th day of July 1757." He also appears on the five muster rolls of Gardiner’s company that cover service from July 20, 1757, to April 6, 1758.

"History of Warren and Sussex Counties, New Jersey," by James P. Snell, 1881, page 317.
"Oct. 1, 1736, Hendrick Van Gorder located a survey of 100 acres on the Delaware River below Flat Rock. He was living on this land in 1743, when John Lawrence, in running the partition line between East and West Jersey, took an offset from his house."

"The Genealogical Magazine of New Jersey," vol. XL, published by the Genealogical Scoiety of New Jersey, 1965, page 143.
+ John Van Gardon taxed for 30 acres of land in Walpack Township, Sussex County, N.J., and three head of livestock in 1773. Listed as Vangordon in 1774.
+ John Van Gardon taxed for one cow in 1773. Not listed on 1774 tax list.

"Official Register of the Officers and Men of New Jersey in the Revolutionary War," compiled by order of William S. Stryker, republished by the Genealogical Publishing Co. in 1967, page 799.
+ John Van Gorden from Sussex County served in Capt. Harker’s company in the 2nd Regiment. [Since two John’s lived in Sussex county in the 1770s, further research will be required before a positive identification for this soldier is made.]

"Documents Related to the Colonial History of the State of New Jersey," First Series, vol. 33, page 448. Abstracted from Sussex County Book 12, page 233. "1764, Aug. 23. Van Gorden, Hendrick, of Sussex Co. Int. Adm’x – Leonora Van Gorden. Fellowbondsmen – Hezekiah Dunn and Amos Pettit; all of said Co. Lib. 12, 233."

"Documents Relating to the Colonial and Revolutionary History of the State of New Jersey," First Series, vol. 34, page 543-544. Abstract from Sussex County Will Book 20, page 301. "1777, Feb. 19. Van Gorden, John, of Sandyston, Sussex Co., yeoman; will of. Wife, Elizabeth, all my estate. Oldest son, Hendrick, 7 shillings. Daughter, Leah, wife of Jacobus Van Gorden, 1 shilling. Daughter, the wife of Preserve Coolly, 1 shilling. Children, Jeremiah, Jacob, Abraham, Isaac, Peter and Elias, rest. Executrix – said wife. Witnesses- John Chambers, Joseph Chestnor, Henry Cronkhill. Proved May 25, 1778. 1777, March 8. Inventory [pounds]63.17.7, made by John Chambers and Jacobus Kermer. Lib. 20, p. 301."

"Records of the Old Dutch Reformed Church, Walpack Township, Sussex Co., N.J.," microfilmed church records provided by Patricia Stavovy of Washington, Pa.
+ May 16, 1749, Jan Van Garden, J.M., born in Rochester, with Lisabeth Van der Merkel, J.D., born at Rochester; both lived at Walpeck.
+ 1750, Lea, daughter of Jan van Garden and Lisabeth van der Merckel. Sponsors were James van der Merckel and Lea Keyser, his wife. Page 14.
+ March 22, 1752, Hendrick, son of Jan van Garden and Lisabeth Merckel. Sponsors were Edward Johnson and Hanna van Garden, his wife. Page 16.
+ June 30, 1754, Marya, daughter of Jan van Garden and Lisabeth van der Merckel. Sponsors were Benjamin van der Merckel and Lisabeth Kermer.
+ Aug. 18, 1766, Catrina, daughter of Jan van gorden and Elisabeth van de merken, baptized Aug. 14, 1766. Sponsors were frederick Edwart (?) and Catrina Edwart (?). Question marks are in original. Page 30.

"Records of the Old Dutch Reformed Church, Walpack Township, Sussex Co., N.J.," microfilmed church records provided by Patricia Stavovy of Washington, Pa.
+ Dec. 4, 1748, Jeremiah, son of James van der Merck and Lea Keyser. Sponsors were Adam Dingenman and Maretje van Garden. Page 11.

Contact me at bebowers@hotmail.com

God demonstrates his own love for us in this:
While we were still sinners, Christ died for us.
- Romans 5:8