Campfire Ashes

   

| Keeper of the Ashes | Troop Ashes Lineage | About | Rules | Ceremony I | Ceremony II |

Keeper of the Ashes
Mr. Lichtman is the self proclaimed keeper of Troop 1325's ashes.  If you would like a envelope of ashes see Mr. Lichtman at a troop meeting.

Troop 1325's Ashes Lineage
Troop 1325's Ashes Lineage - Note that this is a .txt file.  The file will not display correctly in your web browser.  Download the file.  View in a text editor like TextPad or MS Word.  Be sure to turn on "word wrap".  Remember to save as a .txt file.
The text of the lineage includes the two ceremonies listed below.

About the Campfire Ashes Ceremony
The taking of ashes from one campfire to another is a ceremony done by Boy Scouts, Girl Scouts, and Girl
Guides all around the world.  The main purpose of these ashes is to bring to all Scouts and Guides the international
aspect of the world of scouting. Ashes taken from a campfire are sprinkled into the flames of the next campfire.  The
next morning when the ashes are cold, they are stirred and each Scout/ Guide present at the ceremony takes some to mix
with the next campfire. Each Scout/Guide keeps a list of all of the campfires that they have sprinkled their ashes in.
If more than one Scout/Guide brings ashes to the campfire, the lists are combined and the dates and places of all campfires are recorded and passed on.  As Boy Scouts, Girl Scouts, and Girl Guides travel, the ashes circle the globe.  It is a tradition that only those actually present at the campfire can receive ashes from the ceremony to carry on to another campfire.

Some General Rules to keep in mind with this ceremony, and in keeping it special:
- ONLY people that participate in the campfire may collect ashes.
- Some say it is disrespectful to remove ashes from a fire pit used to retire an American Flag. Other say it is fine. There are no rules in the US Flag Code on this issue. Do what you are comfortable with.
- The ashes can be stored in anything, but an empty film canister (becoming hard to find) works GREAT!
- This ceremony can be done at ANY campfire. You don't have to have a full blown program to do it. Sometimes I collect the ash without pomp and ceremony too. Do not forget to update the lineage.
- These days we frequently put out fires with water before there is a good bed of ash. Just mix the cool remains of the campfire and collect the chunks of coal along with the ash. Burn the coal to ash later to a fine ash if you wish (not as easy as you would think) or just use your mixture of coal and ash on your next ceremony.
- If you absolutely have to collect hot ash, collect onto aluminum foil and wrap to smother and cool the embers.
- Watch the little scouts. The fire is dangerous. We do not want anyone standing around the fire waiting to put in ashes to fall on the fire.

There are lots of ash ceremonies. Here are my two favorite:

The Campfire Ash Ceremony (Ashes of Friendship) Ceremony I

THE HISTORY: The taking of ashes from one campfire to another is a ceremony done by Boy Scouts, Girl Scouts, and Girl Guides all around the world. The main purpose of these ashes is to bring to all Scouts and Guides the international aspect of the world of scouting. Ashes taken from a campfire are sprinkled into the flames of the next campfire. The next morning when the ashes are cold, they are stirred and each Scout/ Guide present at the ceremony takes some to mix with the next campfire. Each Scout/Guide keeps a list of all of the campfires that they have sprinkled their ashes in. If more than one Scout/Guide brings ashes to the campfire, the lists are combined and the dates and places of all campfires are recorded and passed on. As Boy Scouts, Girl Scouts, and Girl Guides travel, the ashes circle the globe. It is a tradition that only those actually present at the campfire can receive ashes from the ceremony to carry on to another campfire.

THE CEREMONY: We carry our friendships with us in these ashes from other campfires with comrades in other lands. May the joining of the past fires, with the leaping flames of this campfire, symbolize once more the unbroken chain that binds together scouts and guides of all nations. With greetings from our brothers and sisters around the world, I will add these ashes and the fellowship therein, to our campfire. Will anyone with campfire ashes please come forward and join me.

(Wait for others)

The ashes I spread into this campfire carry memories of past campfires dating back to 1933.
I will now charge these ashes to the campfire. So that you may pass these ashes on and share them with others at your next campfire, you will be given a history of where these ashes have been. (Recite history of ashes added to fire)

Campfire Ashes Ceremony II

Scout 1:
Legend has it that Baden-Powell would always take a small amount of ashes from a ceremonial campfire and then spread these ashes into the next campfire. The main purpose of these ashes is to share with you the memories of past campfires and to bring to all Scouts and Scouters the international aspect of the World Brotherhood of Scouting.

Will anyone with campfire ashes please come forward and join me.

Scout 2:
The ashes I spread into this campfire carry memories of past campfires dating back to 1933. They have been carried around the world to hundreds of scouting campfires in 22 countries where Scouting fellowship has been shared. These ashes have been with Cub Scout Pack 1325 and Boy Scout Troop 1325 since the spring of 2000. They come from national and world jamborees, Boy Scout and Cub Scout resident camps, camporees and many other scout outings,

Scout 3:
I will now charge these ashes to this campfire.

"We carry our friendships with us in these ashes from other campfires with comrades in other lands. May the joining of the past fires, with the leaping flames of this campfire, symbolize once more the unbroken chain that binds together scouts and guides of all nations. With greetings from our brothers and sisters around the world, I add these ashes and the fellowship therein, to our campfire."

Please be careful as you add your ashes to our campfire.


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