SPECIAL NOTE

The following material is an archive of Eva's dance and theater reviews from December 2004 through March 2007.  All other reviews are now available on Eva's ongoing InfiniteBody blog at http://infinitebody.blogspot.com.

*********

Eva Yaa Asantewaa has written on dance since 1974 and worked as a freelance dance journalist since 1976, published in Dance Magazine, The Village Voice, Soho News, The New York Times, Gay City News and other publications. Eva is a contributing writer for Apollinaire Scherr's Foot in Mouth dance blog at www.artsjournal.com/foot, and hosts her own blog on dance--InfiniteBody--at http://infinitebody.blogspot.com/ and the Body and Soul dance podcast at http://magickaleva.hipcast.com/rss/bodyandsoul.xml.

Please visit this page each week or use the form on the Contact Eva page to request automatic notification of postings of new reviews on this site!

 

*************************************************************
Copyediting by Deborah Feller

*************************************************************
PLEASE NOTE

REQUESTING ARCHIVED REVIEWS: Reviews remain online for at least one month past their date of posting. You can use the form on the Contact Eva page to request a copy of an archived review, and it will be emailed to you. Check the Review Archives list at the bottom of this page.

COPYRIGHT INFORMATION: Reviews may be quoted in part by dance artists and companies for publicity or documentation, with the following credit:

Eva Yaa Asantewaa, http://mysite.verizon.net/magickaleva/


The use of quotes or full reprints of reviews, except by dance artists and companies, must be approved by Eva Yaa Asantewaa. All full reprints must be accompanied by the following copyright notice:

YEAR, Eva Yaa Asantewaa, http://mysite.verizon.net/magickaleva/


SNAILMAILING YOUR PRESS INFORMATION: Please send dance, performance, and theater event publicity to Eva Yaa Asantewaa, PO Box 210, Cooper Station, New York, NY 10276. Please check your mailing list to eliminate duplications of Eva's listing and, where necessary, to update her snailmail address. The old address at PO 1133, Peter Stuyvesant is no longer active.

**********************************************************

Listen to interviews with dance artists on Body and Soul, hosted by Eva Yaa Asantewaa.  Subscribe at http://magickaleva.hipcast.com/rss/bodyandsoul.xml.

*************

Field Notes

Posted March 21, 2007

You have to see Tamango. You simply have to. The way you have to see Paris. Or Stonehenge. Or the Niagara Falls.

And if you hurry, you can do it right now through March 25 at the Joyce Theater where Tamango’s Urban Tap presents Bay Mo Dilo (Give Me Water).

Premiered last fall in Miami, Bay Mo Dilo (Give Me Water) is a fine multimedia production dedicated to the memory of the French Guianan poet and scholar Lon Gontrand Damas. Renowned dancer-choreographer Tamango, born in French Guiana and reared in France, runs a tight ship. The show comes in at a neat 75-minutes in length and everything locks together and works: percussion, vocals, dancing, lighting and especially "Naj" Jean de Boysson’s video backdrop.

De Boysson shares directing credits here with Tamango and rightly so. His exhilarating video, spread over one large central screen and two wings, embraces and grounds Tamango’s choreography in the lush, natural context of rain-blessed Latin tropics while spinning it into decidedly headier, hazier realms of sun-dazzled imagination. He’s the perfect collaborator for a master tap dancer who mixes exquisite movement skills, intricate rhythms of the Creole diaspora and modern sound technology.

The show begins with a deceptively sleepy pace. In de Boysson’s video, the fiery ball of the sun bores a hole through thick cloud cover. Vado Diomande–a masked stilt dancer who hails from the Ivory Coast–seems to take forever to rise from the floor to full height, but when he finally stands tall, he’s heaven’s own rooster brusquely waking us to full awareness with his piercing cries.

Percussionists Eric Danquin, Daniel Doulos and "Bonga" Gaston Jean-Baptiste and dancers Jean-Claude Bardu and Belinda Becker slowly emerge from the wings. The musicians set off a tiny racket of high-pitched tapping of wooden sticks on the floor and the sides of their drums. Tamango’s entrance is similarly subdued but his dancing builds in range, speed and volume, digging in and stretching out as rainforest images explode behind him.

The man is glamorous–as in drop-dead, movie-star, rock-star glamorous. He is arguably the sexiest man in dance today. And his occasional self-satisfied grin shows he knows it. His costumes are invariably flattering and fabulous. For Bay Mo Dilo, he wears open vests that drape his bare chest. And the feathery fabric of his slacks shiver as he dances, making his legs look like goat’s legs that end in the shiny hooves of his tap shoes.

And how he dances. He’s got a profound, undulating fluidity I associate more with women than with men. He’s a womanly man. He can out-Tina Turner Tina Turner. He shimmies like your sister Kate and the best bellydancer you’ve ever seen, slipping on a jingly-jangly hip belt to show you.

Tamango is in total physical control, making his improvisations work. He loves music, channels it and maybe something more. In one section of the piece, he removes his tap shoes and dances barefoot on an electronically amplified platform. The eerie sounds suggest the invisible presence of generations of tap’s royalty.

It would be enough to watch just Tamango for a full 75 minutes, but he also graces us with the vivacious dancing of Becker, Bardu and Diomande who, in one memorable passage, tightly circle and churn around him as if whipping up an already raging bonfire. Give me water, indeed!

Catch the fire at the Joyce, now through Sunday. For tickets, call 212-242-0800. For more information, visit www.joyce.org.

2007, Eva Yaa Asantewaa

http://mysite.verizon.net/magickaleva

**********************************************************

Field Notes

Posted: February 23, 2007

Mossa Bildner–the opera-trained, multidisciplinary artist at the helm of the one-night-only Colours of Ritual spectacle at Hunter College’s Kaye Playhouse--is a mellower Diamanda Galas, a way funkier Paul Winter, a Brazilian Auntie Mame on acid. Where others see borders and checkpoints, Bildner hears deep rhythmic and spiritual connections between Candomble, Islam, Judaism and even hip hop. Hang out with her long enough–2 hours to be exact–and you’ll likely see Hebrew and Sanskrit letters dancing before your eyes (at least in the hallucinogenic video by collaborator Feedbuck).

Her cool friends include choreographer Michelle Bastos, who danced a most convincing Iansa--orisha of the whirlwind--and deployed a chorus of talented students from Long Island University; vibraphonist Bill Ware, who served as music director; and a host of accomplished, passionate musicians from as far away as Morocco, Israel and her native land. Unfortunately, Kaye’s acoustic limitations often made the music at its strongest sound flattened and muddy, and did not favor Bildner’s voice. Colours of Ritual deserves another look and listen, minus its less-rewarding excesses and trimmed down to a manageable two hours.

For more on Mossa Bildner and her Rondonia Productions, visit http://www.coloursofritual.org.

  2007, Eva Yaa Asantewaa

http://mysite.verizon.net/magickaleva

**********************************************************

Posted: February 20, 2007

Jelon Vieira, who founded DanceBrazil in New York with the late Loremil Machado, has shaped it into an ensemble of top-notch dancers with a reputation based on generous mainstream entertainment. The troupe, recently concluding its 30th anniversary season at the Joyce Theater, has long been renowned for straightforward performances of capoeira--the thrilling martial arts/dance blend that evolved from the self-defense techniques of Brazil’s African slaves. Vieira’s original choreography entwines contemporary ballet and modern dance techniques with Bahian dance styles and stylized capoeira movement. Audiences love these glimpses of capoeira, but that pleasure only serves to highlight what’s less satisfying about Vieira’s artistry.

Desafio, a recent work that opened this season’s program, is a sprawling ensemble piece set to overly-repetitive, soporific music. For all its activity, it feels disjointed, failing to cohere. Vieira leaves dead space as he moves clusters of dancers from one area of the stage to another. While one dancer attends to some interesting movement in his or her corner, others simply step aside as a group and stand around until it’s time to start moving again; they cease being an engaged and energizing part of the overall stage picture.

In Ritual, a new, seven-sectioned work that celebrates capoeira’s cultural context, Vieira achieves a much more imaginative, integrated dynamism, supported by his dancers’ exceptional technique, grace and spirit. Rino Carvalho (costumes) and the great Chenault Spence (lighting) lavishly contribute to the colorful magic. Ramiro Musotto’s music is given a heady, deeply resonant layering of live berimbau and percussion by Tote Gira’s quartet.

THANK YOU: to all of the people we come from, by guest choreographer Ronald K. Brown, was the program’s strongest offering, a solo for guest dancer Carlos dos Santos paying tribute to "teachers, mentors, advisors and ancestors for giving us clear instructions and a path to this space." As always, Brown draws inspiration and movement ideas from West African, modern, jazz and club dance styles. A solo by Brown often seems less like a show for an audience than a confrontation, conversation, or prayer in a space outside of time where the all-important Other remains unseen. Its beauty lies in the thoughtful, unusual timing and often shifting velocity of phrases; dos Santos has well absorbed the choreographer’s brilliant feeling for music.

Visit DanceBrazil at www.dancebrazil.org. Vieira’s 32nd Annual Capoeira Encounter, featuring workshops, demonstrations and Batizado, will be presented by The Capoeira Foundation on June 2. For more information, visit www.tibacapoeira.com. For a schedule of upcoming events at Joyce Theater, see www.joyce.org.

**********************************************************

Posted January 22, 2007

Lisa Bufano, who recently danced the premiere of Five Open Mouths--a solo choreographed by Heidi Latsky--at Judson Memorial Church, started out as a competitive gymnast and became a club dancer, sculptor and award-winning animator. At age 21 a severe infection eventually necessitated amputation of Bufano’s fingers and both legs below the knee. Today she is an extraordinary young performance artist; take every opportunity to see her!

In her artist’s statement, Bufano writes, "Despite my own terror and discomfort in being watched (or, maybe, because of it), I am finding that being in front of viewers as a performer with deformity can produce a magnetic tension that could be developed into strength. I attempt to channel this tension by exaggerating the mode of physical difference (for example, presenting myself on stilts.)" Wearing sculpted prosthetics–one snazzy pair resembles the shape of a jungle cat’s hind legs--this beautiful athlete can fly across a floor. But she doesn’t need to use the prosthetics, and when she removes them, she becomes a dancer of hushed, serene focus and delicacy.

Latsky’s brazenly expressive dances aim for the heartstrings, but for Five Open Mouths she has made a far more streamlined creation that resolves itself through Bufano’s precision in moments of private reflection and subtle sensuality. Read more about Lisa Bufano at www.LBufano.com and Heidi Latsky at www.heidilatskydance.net.

2007, Eva Yaa Asantewaa

http://mysite.verizon.net/magickaleva

**********************************************************

Field Notes

Posted: January 5, 2007

From now through January 14, La MaMa E.T.C. is hosting Company EAST in Medea, directed, choreographed and designed by Kenji Kawarasaki. This colorful interpretation of Euripedes infuses Greek tragedy with Takagi Noh theater traditions, Western modern dance, and no small measure of camp in the person of its crossdressing star, Hiroshi Jin, the company’s founder. Presented almost entirely in Japanese, the piece runs 75 minutes without intermission.

Kawarasaki’s dreamlike sets and costumes–a mixture of the flashy and the delicate--conjure up a heady, multidimensional realm befitting the extremes of emotion and behavior on display. Jin Nakayama’s effective lighting and the uncredited sound design also contribute to this heightened, haunted sense of place and energy. Even if you don’t understand Japanese, you can catch the drift from all this visual and sonic intensity, and the melodramatic story is a familiar one: He (Jason) done her (Medea) wrong, so she kills their kids, and they spend ages cursing each other.

Our Medea (Jin) manages to be both graceful–such supple hands!–and creepy in her costume parade of rat’s-nest wigs and gleaming gold robes. Jason (Sho Tohno) has the bearing and moves of a panther and the body and courage to go bare-assed in front of a room of strangers. The royal princess Glauce–Jason’s new flame–is portrayed by Yoko Tomabechi, a winsome and sublime dancer. If all the whimpering and trash talking in Japanese threatens to lull you to sleep, the sight of these three in action will help prop up your eyelids.

But we’ll have to wait a bit longer for what will surely be Jin’s piece de resistance. His bio informs us that the multitalented artist "also lectures at corporate seminars and other venues, as a spiritual, pheremonal dancer wielding the power of appearance and adept in performance from Greek tragedy to male strip show. Jin’s new book Twice as Attractive: The Spi-Fero Power of Appearance Secret of Success is currently in negotiation with publishers." [sic] (Catch Medea at The Annex at La MaMa now through Sunday, January 14, 7:30, with a 2:30 matinee on Sunday. Visit www.lamama.org or call 212-475-7710.)

2007, Eva Yaa Asantewaa

http://mysite.verizon.net/magickaleva

**********************************************************

Field Notes

Posted: January 3, 2007

Jenny Rocha’s The Painted Ladies, presented in the front room at Williamsburg’s Galapagos Arts Space, made good on its promise of "a fusion of dance, percussion, vaudeville & burlesque." At first I wondered if these women would be better served by a conventional concert format in a proper theater. But Rocha and her five talented colleagues were indeed in the right place. Part feminist satire, part neo-feminist celebration, The Painted Ladies depicted feisty, sometimes comic, show girls down through history. Fittingly, the dancers performed on a saloon’s shallow stage to the intermittent amusement of hipsters with drinks in hand.

To allow for costume changes, the evening’s seven "acts"–most the length of a pop song–were interspersed with long stretches of pounding rock music and patron chatter. After each change, the MC poked her head out from behind the curtain and signaled the crowd with her whistle’s shrill blast to shut up and look. A few young men pushed away from the bar, the better to get an unobstructed view of provocatively-clad women cavorting to tunes by PJ Harvey, Devo and Pat Benatar. Audience and venue merged with the performance in a brilliant way that made up for the choppy rhythm of the evening.

Some of the action was predictable: Ladies in thigh-high satin robes shadow-boxing to the Rocky theme and a burlesque set to Devo’s "Whip It.". But wit, technical precision, and exuberance lifted everything else, particularly Act One’s frisky, percussive stylings of Shevaun Smythe Hiler, Jillian Hollis and Rocha, and Act Four’s Louisiana gumbo-style stomp, both set to music by the blues/world music fusion band Hazmat Modine. (Disclaimer: My wife and I know Wade Schuman, Hazmat Modine’s bandleader and now, with a clear conscience, I can direct you to Richard Marcus’s excellent review of that group’s new CD, Bahamut, at http://desicritics.org/2006/12/28/061954.php.) Rocha’s full-out, confident, passionate style in performance as well as choreography makes her an artist to watch in 2007. Also keep an eye on Christine Poland whose Marie Antoinette-like turn in Act Six–set to Pat Benatar’s "Anxiety (Get Nervous)"–showed her to be a promising physical comedian.

 2007, Eva Yaa Asantewaa

http://mysite.verizon.net/magickaleva/

**********************************************************

Posted October 26, 2006

THEATER NOTES

Roger Guenveur Smith in Who Killed Bob Marley?

The Gatehouse

HARLEM STAGE/Aaron Davis Hall

150 Convent Avenue at West 135th Street, Manhattan

through October 28

All you have to do is take the #1 IRT to 137th Street, walk two blocks south to 135th, and two blocks east to Convent Avenue to find the landmark Gatehouse, a charming Romanesque Revival-style building built in 1890 as a conduit for water from Westchesters Croton Aqueduct to New York City. Today it serves up art for the people as the new home of HARLEM STAGE/Aaron Davis Hall whose executive director, Patricia Cruz, calls it "a cathedral or theater of water, if you will." Get used to making the tripyoure going to love this place. And with eminent artists of color like Sekou Sendiata, Tania Len, and Bill T. Jones presenting commissioned works (in the WaterWorks series) in its wonderfully intimate space, the Gatehouse will prove to be a vital part of New Yorks cultural scene.

On October 24th, actor Roger Guenveur Smith got things off to a good start with the premiere of Who Killed Bob Marley? The piece, written and performed by Smith, features his monologue set against a video by Arthur Jafa and scored by Marc Anthony Thompson. Despite the implications of its eye-catching title, this poetic work is a tender if often hallucinatory meditation on death, near death, and the preciousness of inspiration, relationship, and life itself.

The Gatehouse seats under 200 people and tickets to the remaining shows are scarce. Try your luck at 212-650-7100 or visit www.harlemstage.org.

2006, Eva Yaa Asantewaa

http://mysite.verizon.net/magickaleva/

**********************************************************

Field Notes

Posted: October 23, 2006

MATA HARI RE/CONSIDERED

In De/ReConstructing Mata Hari, presented at the Alvin Ailey studios Citigroup Theater (Joan Weill Center for Dance), Nejla Yasemin Yatkina performer and choreographer of Turkish and Egyptian descent--offered a feminist and compassionate portrayal of the exotic, ultimately tragic, Dutch-born dancer. The hour-long dance solo labored under a sincere but tedious texta collaboration of Yatkin, her husband Christian Davenport, and Alison Ragland--that outlined Mata Haris life and times. Some sections, tied to longish musical pieces of limited dynamics, felt longer than they actually were in clock time. The piece would benefit from editing and would be worth it. Remarkably strong of visage and physique, Yatkin is a stellar performer and has an expert way with visual effects, including some eye-catching business with her silken backdrop that might make Miss Ruth and Loie Fuller cry in envy. And when shes dressed up as her alter-ego Mata Hari in optimistic, glamourous youth, with black-and-white images of Amsterdam sliding behind her, you just want to shout out, "Wear that hat, Ms. Thing!" For more information about Yatkins work, visit www.ny2dance.com.

2006, Eva Yaa Asantewaa

http://mysite.verizon.net/magickaleva/

**********************************************************

THEATER NOTES

Emergence-SEE!

The Public Theater

425 Lafayette Street

through November 12

Emergence-SEE!a new one-man show by the Black actor-playwright Daniel Beaty, directed by Kenny Leon at The Public Theaterreminded me that first impressions can indeed be deceiving. The show I feared I was seeing was not the one that quickly emerged, knocked me for a loop, and stole my heart.

The place: New York City. The time: today. The anomaly: the sudden appearance of a slave ship named "Remembrance" in the Hudson River harbor, right off Liberty Island. In just under 90 minutes, Beaty channels 43 characters, mostly New Yorkers, some of whose lives are or will become tightly interwoven in poignant, humorous, and potentially transformative ways.

Even before the show begins, LuEsther Hall--the small, third-floor space--resounds with the sloshing of water and the terrible creaking and sighing of an ancient vessel. Beowulf Boritts set resembles a haphazard array of ship wreckage, a threatening space that Beaty will confidently negotiate as if there were nothing to it. And he will develop his intricate story as if there were nothing to memorizing millions of words, mastering a multitude of nationalities, genders, accents, verbal styles, body languages, ideologies, and attitudes. If youre thinking "Anna Deveare Smith," your sort of close, but youll have to envision that esteemed performer on warp speed, slipping in and out of her characters with seamless transitions that leave viewers breathless. At first, Beatys glib verbal and physical facility and his speed can be disconcerting, everything zipping by the eyes and ears way too fast. Its hard to care about people who appear to be pointless caricatures. But then Beaty slows down and drops anchor.

The shows main focus is Rodney, an adult son in a Harlem family well-acquainted with tragedy: the mothers murder and the grieving fathers gradual descent into mental illness. Rodney, who learns that his father has somehow boarded the ghost ship, spends much of the show attempting to connect with his gay brother Freddy and head down to the frantic media circus at the Statue of Liberty. Freddy is only one of several delectable characters with whom Beaty spends quality time and his depiction is pitch perfect. There are also the hostess of an uptown poetry slam, a transgender prostitute, a Harlem Boys Choir singer, a Ghanaian tour guide at the Cape Coast slave dungeons, and a whole lot more. Beaty becomes not merely a generic homeless man but oneby virtue of his particular singing voice and swaggering attitude--I can swear Ive heard on the street. He gives us something not totally unexpected herea side trip into a sweet, warm memory from his childhood in the South. He steps very close to a line labeled "clich," looks over the line but doesnt cross it.

Heart-tugging? Yes. And by the time Beaty brings Emergence-SEE! to closurein a whirlwind wind-up that underscores its unusual titlehe has successfully assembled an enormous number of open hearts right in front of him and he can bring on the uplift. It works. (Emergence-SEE! runs through November 12. For information and tickets, see www.publictheater.org, call 212-967-7555, or visit the Public Theaters box office at 425 Lafayette Street. For more information on Daniel Beaty, visit www.danielbeaty.com or www.myspace.com/danielbeaty.)

2006, Eva Yaa Asantewaa

http://mysite.verizon.net/magickaleva/

**********************************************************

Field Notes

Posted: October 11, 2006

ALL AROUND TOWN, SISTAHS ARE DOING IT FOR THEMSELVES

The Bronx is up!

Christal Brown is an outstanding presence in companies headed by Jawole Willa Jo Zollar, Chuck Davis, and Andrea E. Woods, and their aesthetic, spiritual, and political influences can be seen in the work she makes for Inspirit: A Dance Company, her sensational multicultural womens troupe. Their program Black Thighs recently ran at BAAD!--the Hunts Point center where choreographer Arthur Aviles and his partner, writer-activist Charles Rice-Gonzles, maintain a community base for Bronx artists of admirable diversity. Browns dancers, evoking the strength of the ancestors and the sassiness of todays feminists/womanists, took on movement as if it were an opponent to be grabbed and wrestled to the mat. They were also capable of tenderness and sensitivity toward one another, and sacred gestures performed with hushed solemnity. But Browns solo Wishes will likely be remembered above everything else for representing this dance seasons fiercest use of nudity. Brown silenced an imagined street heckler by giving him what he implied he wantedseeing whats under her clothesand then flipped the script, scorching him with superior verbal power. She breathed fire, while maintaining her cool. (Follow Inspirits progress at www.inspiritdance.com, and connect with BAAD!--The Bronx Academy of Arts & Dance--at http://www.BronxAcademyOfArtsAndDance.org.

Chelsea when it sizzles...and sometimes fizzles

As Joan Myers Browns Philadanco celebrates its 37th anniversary season, more congratulations are in order for the troupes exemplary performance in Daniel Ezralows Pulse; a dozen dancers slip-slide across the Joyce Theater floor like Olympic speed skaters and execute wave after wave of complex configurations under designer Howell Binkleys ethereal shower of light. Pulse made a rousing, entertaining opener for a recent Saturday family matinee show. This kid-size performance omitted Love Stories--a New York premiere by Carmen de Lavallade--but regrettably included excerpts from Ronald K. Browns For Truth, an unsurprising, modest piece commissioned by Wolf Trap Foundation for the Performing Arts for Browns company EVIDENCE and for Philadanco. Unfortunately, Philadanco looked uncomfortable attempting Browns usually delectable stew of African, modern, and club dancing. On these sleek, well-behaved performersespecially the womenhis handsome style seemed artificial, totally alien. Their desperate smiles and selling-it approach were off-putting. At the very least, its time to remove those prim ballet buns from the backs of the womens heads. (Visit Philadanco at www.philadanco.org. For information about the Joyce Theater season, see www.joyce.org.)

Heard whats going on downtown?

Our city tour next takes us to Bleecker Streetthe tiny 45 Below caf theater of Culture Project, to be specific--where dancer-choreographer-spoken word artist Andrea E. Woods conducted a free, four-week series of movement workshops as part of Culture Projects politically-progressive Impact Festival (www.impactfestival.org). Entitled Political MovementDancing to Be Heard and offered to "all artists who move," the series attracted a small group of technically-proficient female dancers. The workshops were designed with the aim of "uncovering, discovering, and communicating our points of view about our lives, our community, and our world." Woods opened each session with a warmup with mellow jazz or irresistible house music pumping in the background, then posed increasingly complicated, multi-sensory challenges to both body and mind. These twisty exercises were designed to stimulate the dancersability to look and listen to one another with more sensitivity and to express themselves more effectively. "This mixes things up in an electric way," Woods told her students. "You really have to be on your toes, alert toevery sound and sight." One student remarked, "Its like when Im driving a car and things are happening all over the place." As a critic writing about dance, I can relate to the complexity of linetracking, grasping, and comprehending multiple sources of information from "all over the place" and then searching for the clearest way to report what Ive experienced. I relish this challenge, and I suspect that Woodss methods would be fruitful training for my colleagues and for non-dancers who enjoy watching dance. (Visit SOULOWORKS/Andrea E. Woods & Dancers at www.souloworks.com, and see Woodss new Afro-Cuban "soulowork" on Sunday, October 15, 8:30pm, part of Danspace Projects FOOD FOR THOUGHT series. For details and ticket information, visit www.danspaceproject.org.)

Heading up west for the best

Some enormously gifted people contributed to Francesca Harpers Modo Fusion Lounge showcase up at Makor/Steinhardt Centers intimate caf space on West 67th Street. For starters, there was the stunning Harper herselfthe kind of artist and performer whose pile-up of talents quickly exhausts a keyboards hyphen or comma keys. Shes a "conceptual pop artist," film director, lyricist, dancer, singer, and actor currently understudying two roles in The Color Purple. (Her Modo Fusion colleagues also hail from the shows current or former casts.) For full details about Harpers mountain of achievements, check out www.francescaharper.com. Modo Fusion Lounge incorporated original music, ferocious dancing (by Jamal Story and Kemba Shannon), film, poetry, humor, and a whole lot of fun. Harpers chorus included Maia Wilson, Saycon Sengbloh, and Jackie Arnold, with special guest singers James Harkness and Krisha Marcan. Her grooving band included Damon Banks (bass), Bruce Cox (drums), Onaje Allan Gumbs (keyboard), and Victor Y. See Yuen (percussion). Watch out for more Modo Fusion. Clamor for it. But mind those aisle seats. My poor shoulder has finally stopped stinging where the muscular and wired Shannon, making her first entrance, suddenly grabbed it as she barreled down the aisle like a bowling ball. This show holds nothing back!

All around

A hearty round of applause for Jawole Willa Jo Zollar--Urban Bush Womens founder and guiding lightfor winning a 2006 Bessies (NY Dance and Performance) Award. Her citation reads, "For celebrating a great champion of art and justice; for dedication to community, heritage, and healing; for mobilizing one of the strongest dance ensembles in the world; and for opening our hearts and reminding us all to love ourselves fiercely, a 2006 New York Dance and Performance Award goes to Jawole Willa Jo Zollar for "Walking with Pearl...Southern Diaries" at Dance New Amsterdam." ( Learn more about Zollar and UBW at http://www.urbanbushwomen.org/home.html.)

Ach!

2006, Eva Yaa Asantewaa

http://mysite.verizon.net/magickaleva/

**********************************************************

Field Notes
Posted: October 2, 2006

SKINT
the new evening-length ensemble performance by dancer-choreographer Caitlin Cook--could only get a rise out of someone who would rather be up front at an all-grrrrls punk band gig of any quality, than be watching a dance concert, even one hosted by a venue as edgy as The Kitchen. Cook naturally bridges the worlds of dance and rock, having performed with the bands Excepter and VIZUSA, and involves several musician colleagues in the seamless, if tediously obvious, sound/movement hybrid that is SKINT. Trouble is, theres no news here, no insight, no sense of significance or necessity, and this dissatisfied viewer came away wondering what pop cultural phenomenon dance makers will excavate next. I guess hip-hop is beginning to seem a little old to the downtown folks. (For a schedule of upcoming events at The Kitchen, visit www.thekitchen.org.)

Something old can be new again when done right. Black fedoras off to the directors, choreographers, and cast of the Honv
d Dance Company, Heged\pard fs20 s Folk Band, and wondrous singer gnes Knstler and singer-guitarist Jzsef Balog of Lindri Ensemble who teamed up for World Music Institutes Gypsy Fire, a co-presentation of World Music Institute, NYU Skirball Center, and Mehanata Meyhane. This grand evening--part of the New York Gypsy Festival and the multinational, multi-venue European Dream Festival--featured refined, tasty musicianship and dynamically-staged choreography inspired by traditional dances from Hungarys Carpathian Basin. Honvds male dancers ruled the stage, permitted by custom to perform the hip-twisty, lightning-quick footwork and kicks that keep pace with the musics accelerating beat while their female counterparts sedately skitter and twirl. How fascinating that, like enslaved Africans forbidden to play drums, Hungarian gypsies cleverly devised ways to use their bodies as percussion instruments along with humble implements like metal jugs and wooden spoons. The hair-n raising stick dancing of the Roma would also be familiar to fans who thrill to Brazils maculele, performed with sticks or machetes. Gypsy Fires one-night stand was an irresistible treat. Lets hope someone brings it back to New York for a more generous run. (Connect to the world-wide cultural web at www.worldmusicinstitute.org, www.nygypsyfest.com, www.mehanata.com, and www.europeandream.us.)

More Dancers to Watch Out For

Skin
no, Im not repeating myselfis the name of a dance by choreographer Emily Berry who joins Pascha Barnwell-Conway in this memorable duet about race relations. Recently presented at Dixon Place in a program curated by Marcia Monroe, Skin boasted intelligent and strong performances by these womenone white, one blackwho literally grappled with each other while confronting urgent questions of racial identity and common humanity. Watch for future work by Emily Berry and her Beyond Third Wave dance troupe. (For further information on Dixon Place programs, visit www.dixonplace.org.)

2006, Eva Yaa Asantewaa
http://mysite.verizon.net/magickaleva/

*****************************************************

ARCHIVED REVIEWS

(To order a copy of any of the following reviews, please use the form on Eva's Contact page. Specify which review you'd like to receive.)

  • Posted: September 25, 2006
  • Field Notes (danscores by Ofelia Loret de Mola at Joyce Soho)

*****************************************************

  • Posted: August 23, 2006
  • Field Notes (Ellis Wood Dance in Fire on Wall Street)

*****************************************************

  • THEATER NOTES
  • AMAJUBA: Like Doves We Rise
  • The Culture Project
  • 45 Bleecker Street

*****************************************************

  • Posted: August 15, 2006
  • Field Notes: contra-tiempo at DNA

*****************************************************

  • Posted: June 30, 2006
  • Field Notes: Chikako Iwahori and Max Pollak at The Stone and Nicholasleichterdance at DNA

*****************************************************

  • Posted: June 17, 2006
  • Field Notes: Myung Soo Kim at The Duke on 42nd St. and Hoofer’s House at Studio Museum in Harlem, featuring Dormeshia Sumbry Edwards, Rashida Bumbray, Tamango and the Ali Jackson Trio.

******************************************************

  • Posted: June 2, 2006
  • Field Notes: Anemone Dance Theater; Neta Dance Company; Deganit Shemy; Layard Thompson; ZviDance!

*****************************************************

  • Posted: May 15, 2006
  • Field Notes: Chris Elam/Misnomer Dance Theater

*****************************************************

  • Posted: May 12, 2006
  • Field Notes: Dances by Abigail Levine; Wendy Osserman at Theater for the New City

******************************************************

  • Posted: April 27, 2006
  • Field Notes: Akram Khan Company at the Rose Theater at Lincoln Center

******************************************************

  • Posted: April 21, 2006
  • Field Notes: Sourcing Stravinsky at DTW, featuring works by Annie-B Parson, Yvonne Rainer, Rennie Harris, David Neumann/Advance Beginner Group, Cynthia Hopkins, and Dayna Hanson and Linas Phillips

*****************************************************

  • Posted: April 17, 2006
  • Field Notes: Maria Hassabi at The Kitchen

*****************************************************

  • Posted: February 24, 2006
  • Field Notes: Sean Curran Company at DNA

*****************************************************

  • Posted: February 16, 2006
  • Field Notes: Reggie Wilson/Fist & Heel Performance Group

*****************************************************

  • Posted: January 30, 2006
  • Field Notes: Troika Ranch’s 16 [R]evolutions at Eyebeam Art & Technology Center; Adrienne Truscott at PS 122; SWEAT Modern Dance Series at The Center for the Performing Arts at DeBaun Auditorium in Hoboken, featuring performances by Karl Anderson/SLAMFEST, Arthur Aviles Typical Theatre, Janessa Clark/KILTERBOX, Randy James Dance Works, Ali Kenner & Company, and Deborah Lohse.

*****************************************************

  • Review No. 57
  • Posted: January 21, 2006
  • LeeSaar The Company
  • PS 122
  • January 19, 2006

*****************************************************

  • Review No. 56
  • Posted: December 7, 2005
  • John Jasperse Company
  • The Kitchen
  • December 6, 2005

*****************************************************

  • Review No. 55
  • Posted: December 3, 2005
  • Miguel Gutierrez and the Powerful People
  • Dance Theater Workshop
  • November 30, 2005
  • plus: New: Field NotesArmitage Gone! Dance at The Duke on 42nd Street and The Anahid Sofian Dance Company at Baruch Performing Arts Center

*****************************************************

  • Review No. 54
  • Posted: November 29, 2005
  • Jazz Tap Ensemble
  • Joyce Theater
  • November 27, 2005

*****************************************************

  • Review No. 53
  • Posted: November 25, 2005
  • Batsheva Dance Company
  • BAM 2005 Next Wave Festival
  • James and Martha Duffy Performance Space at the Mark Morris Dance Center
  • November 23, 2005
  • *****************************************************

    • Review No. 52
    • Posted: November 25, 2005
    • LIMS MOSAIC 2005
    • Danspace Project
    • November 22, 2005

    *****************************************************

    • Review No. 51
    • Posted: November 14, 2005
    • La Compagnie du Hanneton in Bright Abyss
    • BAM Harvey Theater
    • November 9, 2005

    *****************************************************

    • Review No. 50
    • Posted: November 12, 2005
    • Jane Goldberg
    • Blue Mountain Gallery
    • November 11, 2005

    ******************************************************

    • Review No. 49
    • Posted: November 8, 2005
    • Akemi Takeya
    • Japan Society
    • November 4, 2005

    *****************************************************

    • Review No. 48
    • Posted: November 5, 2005
    • lower lights collective
    • The Chocolate Factory
    • November 3, 2005

    *****************************************************

    • Review No. 47
    • Posted: October 31, 2005
    • Joyce S. Lim and Paz Tanjuaquio
    • Danspace Project
    • October 28, 2005

    *****************************************************

    • Review No. 46
    • Posted: October 27, 2005
    • Jodi Melnick and Scott Heron
    • Dance Theater Workshop
    • October 26, 2005

    *****************************************************

    • Review No. 45
    • Posted: September 24, 2005
    • Tamar Rogoff Performance Projects
    • P.S. 122
    • September 23, 2005

    *****************************************************

    • Review No. 44
    • Posted: September 22, 2005
    • Jennifer Monson/BIRD BRAIN/iLAND
    • Dance Theater Workshop
    • September 19, 2005

    *****************************************************

    • Review No. 43
    • Posted: September 21, 2005
    • Breaking Ground: A Dance Charrette
    • The Tobacco Warehouse
    • Empire-Fulton Ferry State Park
    • DUMBO, Brooklyn
    • September 17, 2005

    *****************************************************

    • Review No. 42
    • Posted: September 20, 2005
    • Black Grace
    • The New Victory Theater
    • September 16, 2005

    *****************************************************

    • Review No. 41
    • Posted: September 17, 2005
    • Beverly Blossom Solo
    • Baruch Performing Arts Center
    • September 15, 2005

    *****************************************************

    • Review No. 40
    • Posted: September 15, 2005
    • Agora
    • Sens/Nomie Lafrance
    • McCarren Park Pool
    • Greenpoint/Williamsburg, Brooklyn
    • September 13, 2005

    *****************************************************

    • Review No. 39
    • Posted: August 25, 2005
    • Frida and Herself
    • Anandam
    • The New York International Fringe Festival
    • The Linhart Theatre @ 440 Studios
    • August 24, 2005

    *****************************************************

    • Review No. 38
    • Posted: August 18, 2005
    • The Velocity of Things
    • Regina Nejman & Company
    • The New York International Fringe Festival
    • August 16, 2005

    *****************************************************

    • Review No. 37
    • Posted: August 4, 2005
    • Chris Elam/Misnomer Dance Theater
    • Lower Manhattan Cultural Councils Sitelines
    • August 2, 2005

    *****************************************************

    • Review No. 36
    • Posted: July 20, 2005
    • Shen Wei Dance Arts
    • Lincoln Center Festival 2005
    • New York State Theater
    • July 19, 2005

    *****************************************************

    • Review No. 35
    • Posted: July 18, 2005
    • Pilobolus (Megawatt>Full Strength)
    • Joyce Theater
    • July 16, 2005

    *****************************************************

    • Review No. 34
    • Posted: July 14, 2005
    • Merce Cunningham Dance Company
    • Lincoln Center Festival
    • Rose Theater, Frederick P. Rose Hall, Time Warner Center
    • July 12, 2005

    *****************************************************

    • Review No. 33
    • Posted: July 9, 2005
    • Reel: Tom Pearson
    • Sitelines
    • Smithsonian National Museum of the American Indian
    • July 7, 2005

    *****************************************************

    • Review No. 32
    • Posted: July 6, 2005
    • Tap City
    • Program A: Tap All Stars/Tap Internationals
    • Joyce Theater
    • July 3, 2005

    *****************************************************

    • Review No. 31
    • Posted: June 25, 2005
    • Jody Sperling/Time Lapse Dance
    • Harry De Jur Playhouse/Abrons Arts Center
    • Henry Street Settlement
    • June 24, 2005

    *****************************************************

    • Review No. 30
    • Posted: June 23, 2005
    • Urban Bush Women
    • Joyce Theater
    • June 21, 2005

    *****************************************************

    • Review No. 29
    • Posted: June 17, 2005
    • Sarah Michelson
    • Performance Space 122
    • June 15, 2005

    *****************************************************

    • Review No. 28
    • Posted: June 4, 2005
    • Cirque loize in RAIN
    • The New Victory Theater
    • June 3, 2005

    *****************************************************

    • Review No. 27
    • Posted: June 2, 2005
    • David Dorfman Dance
    • Joyce Theater
    • May 31, 2005

    *****************************************************

    • Review No. 26
    • Posted: May 20, 2005
    • MOMIX
    • Joyce Theater
    • May 19, 2005

    *****************************************************

    • Special Report
    • Posted: May 16, 2005
    • Dance and Politics: Does It Matter?
    • Laban/Bartenieff Institute of Movement Studies
    • May 12, 2005

    *****************************************************

    • Special Announcement
    • Posted: May 16, 2005
    • The Gregory Hines Collection of American Tap Dance Opens at The New York Public Library for the Performing Arts

    **************************************************

    • Review No. 25
    • Posted: May 16, 2005
    • Lawrence Goldhuber/BIGMANARTS
    • Danspace Project
    • May 13, 2005

    ***********************************************************

    • Review No. 24
    • Posted: May 14, 2005
    • The New, New Stuff
    • Choreography: Christopher Williams; Leonardo Smith and Sarah Vasilas
    • Curator: Natalie Johnsonius
    • Peformance Space 122
    • May 12, 2005

    *****************************************************

    • Review No. 23
    • Posted: May 6, 2005
    • Arthur Aviles Typical Theatre
    • BAAD! (Bronx Academy of Arts and Dance)
    • May 5, 2005

    *****************************************************

    • Review No. 22
    • Posted: May 6, 2005
    • Pat Graney Company
    • Dance Theater Workshop
    • May 4, 2005

    ******************************************************

    • Review No. 21
    • Posted: May 6, 2005
    • Rene Archibald and Friends
    • two tuesdays, tear up tear down
    • The John Houseman Theater
    • May 3, 2005

    *****************************************************

    • Review No. 20
    • Posted: April 29, 2005
    • chameckilerner
    • Dance Theater Workshop
    • April 27, 2005

    *****************************************************

    • Review No. 19
    • Posted: April 23, 2005
    • Nadine Helstroffer, guest artist
    • David Hykes and The Harmonic Choir
    • Harmonic Universe Festival: Music from the Heart of the Cosmos
    • Rubin Museum of Art
    • April 22, 2005

    ******************************************************

    • Review No. 18
    • Posted: April 23, 2005
    • Wendy Osserman Dance Company
    • Theater for The New City
    • April 21, 2005

    *******************************************************

    • Review No. 17
    • Posted: April 18, 2005
    • Andrea E. Woods/Souloworks
    • Leonard Nimoy Thalia Theatre at Symphony Space
    • April 15, 2005

    *****************************************************

    • Review No. 16
    • Posted: April 16, 2005
    • Aszure & Artists
    • Joyce Soho
    • April 14, 2005

    *****************************************************

    • Review No. 15
    • Posted: April 15, 2005
    • Trisha Brown Dance Company
    • Rose Theater, Time Warner Center
    • April 13, 2005

    ***********************************************************

    • Review No. 14
    • Posted: March 30, 2005
    • DELIRIOUS/dances by Edisa Weeks
    • Makor/Steinhardt Center of the 92nd Street Y
    • March 28, 2005

    *****************************************************

    • Review No. 13
    • Posted: March 26, 2005
    • Artist-in-Residence Work & Show Festival 2005
    • Tribeca Performing Arts Center
    • Borough of Manhattan Community College
    • March 24, 2005

    *****************************************************

    • Review No. 12
    • Posted: March 24, 2005
    • LTTR: Lets take the role
    • The Kitchen
    • Manhattan
    • March 22, 2005

    *************************************

    • Review No. 11
    • Posted: March 18, 2005
    • Pearsonwidrig Dancetheater
    • 92 on 42
    • The 92nd St Y Harkness Dance Project
    • at The Duke on 42nd Street
    • Manhattan

    *****************************************************

    • Review No. 10
    • Posted: March 11, 2005
    • Roxane Butterflys Worldbeats
    • 92 on 42
    • The 92nd St Y Harkness Dance Project
    • at The Duke on 42nd Street
    • Manhattan

    ******************************************

    • Review No. 9
    • Posted: March 7, 2005
    • DanceBrazil
    • The Joyce Theater
    • Manhattan

    *****************************************************

    Review No. 8
    Posted: February 23, 2005
    Dance Conversations
    The Flea Theater
    Manhattan

    ******************************************************

    Review No. 7
    Posted: February 18, 2005
    "they are not falling"
    Alejandra Martorell
    P.S. 122
    Manhattan
    February 17, 2005

    ***********************************************************

    Review No. 6
    Posted: February 5, 2005
    "Dancing the Numbers"
    Polly Motley
    Danspace Project
    Manhattan
    February 4, 2005

    ****************************************************

    Review No. 5
    Posted: February 5, 2005
    "Disturbulance"
    Keely Garfield
    Dance Theater Workshop
    Manhattan
    February 2, 2005

    *****************************************************

    Review No. 4
    Posted: February 1, 2005
    "Drawn Part 2"
    Aki Sasamoto, Lily Skove, Arturo Vidich
    Movement Research at The Judson Church
    Manhattan
    January 31, 2005

    *******************************************************
    Review No. 3
    Posted: January 15, 2005
    "Beacon"
    Yanira Castro + Company
    Brooklyn Lyceum
    Park Slope, Brooklyn
    January 14, 2005

    "*******************************************************

    Review No. 2
    Posted: January 5, 2005
    CLASSICAL SAVION

    Joyce Theater, Manhattan
    January 4, 2005

    *********************************************************

    Review No. 1
    Posted: December 28, 2004
    ICE THEATRE OF NEW YORK
    Sky Rink at Chelsea Piers, Manhattan
    December 27, 2004

    ************************************************

    Special Note: The December 2004 issue of Dance Magazine includes "The Divine Within: The Spiritual Dimension of Dancers' Lives and Work," with statements from Nai-Ni Chen, Arthur Aviles, Ayodele Casel, Christalyn Wright, Karen Sherman, Rennie Harris, Barbara Dilley, and Mohamed Youssef, compiled by Eva Yaa Asantewaa. For information on how to obtain a back issue, contact Dance Magazine at 212-979-4803.