Blue Jay

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(This article is about the bird. For other uses, see Blue Jay (disambiguation).)


Blue Jay
Image:Blue_jay.jpg
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Aves
Order: Passeriformes
Family: Corvidae
Genus: Cyanocitta
Species: cristata
Binomial name
Cyanocitta cristata
(Linnaeus, 1758)

The Blue Jay (Cyanocitta cristata) is a North American jay, a handsome bird with predominantly lavender-blue to mid-blue feathering from the top of the head to midway down the back. There is a pronounced crest on the head. The colour changes to black, sky-blue and white barring on the wing primaries and the tail. The bird has an off-white underside, with a black collar around the neck and sides of the head and a white face.

Distribution map
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Distribution map

It occurs over a very large area of the eastern side of North America from Newfoundland in the northeast to Florida in the southeast and westward to Texas and the mid-west and eastern Colorado in the north. It is mainly a bird of mixed woodland, including American beech and various oak species, but also of parks and gardens in some towns and cities. West of the Rockies, it is replaced by the closely related Steller's Jay.

Its food is sought both on the ground and in trees and includes virtually all known types of plant and animal sources, such as acorns and beech mast, weed seeds, grain, fruits and other berries, peanuts, bread, meat, eggs and nestlings, small invertebrates of many types, scraps in town parks and bird-table food.

Its aggressive behavior at feeding stations as well as its reputation for occasionally destroying the nests and eggs of other birds has made the Blue Jay unwelcome at some bird feeders.

Any suitable tree or large bush may be used for nesting and both sexes build the nest and rear the young, though only the female broods them. There are usually 4-5 eggs laid and incubated over 16-18 days. The young are fledged usually between 17-21 days.

Although this bird is generally found year round through most of its range, some northern birds do move into the southern parts of the range. These birds migrate during the day.

The voice is typical of most jays in being varied, but the most common sound is usually the alarm call, which is a loud, almost gull-like scream. There is also a high-pitched jayer-jayer call that increases in speed as the bird becomes more agitated.

The Blue Jay is the provincial bird of Prince Edward Island and gave its name to the Toronto Blue Jays baseball team. It is also the namesake of the sports teams at Creighton and Johns Hopkins Universities.