A Collection of References to the “Septuagint Plus” in the New Testament
The references in the table below were culled from Nestle-Aland’s Greek-English New Testament, Appendix IV, and from marginal notes in Thomas Nelson’s reprint of the 1611 Authorized Version and Lazarus Ministry Press’s facsimile edition of the 1560 Geneva Bible.
LXX Reference New Testament Reference Comments
Judith 13.18
Then said Ozias unto her, O daughter, blessed art thou of the most high God above all the women upon the earth; and blessed be the Lord God, which hath created the heavens and the earth, which hath directed thee to the cutting off of the head of the chief of our enemies.
Luke 1.42
And she spake out with a loud voice, and said, Blessed art thou among women, and blessed is the fruit of thy womb.
Judith was called blessed in this passage because she beheaded Holofernes, who symbolized the devil.  Similarly, in Judges 5.24, Jael the wife of Heber the Kenite was termed blessed above women after she had killed Sisera, the commander of the Canaanite army, by driving a peg through his temple.  Gabriel may have had these women in mind when he referred to Mary in this way, because she was to bring forth the Christ, who would “destroy him that had the power of death, even the devil” (Hebrews 2.4).
Tobit 2.2
And when I saw abundance of meat, I said to my son, Go and bring what poor man soever thou shalt find out of our brethren, who is mindful of the Lord; and, lo, I tarry for thee.
Luke 14.13
But when thou makest a feast, call the poor, the maimed, the lame, the blind
Tobit provides an example of the behavior Jesus enjoins.
Tobit 4.15
Do that to no man which thou hatest
Matthew 7.12
Therefore all things whatsoever ye would that men should do to you, do ye even so to them: for this is the law and the prophets.

Luke 6.31
And as ye would that men should do to you, do ye also to them likewise.

See also Sirach 31.15.  The 1560 Geneva Bible, the Bible of the Marian exiles, and the 1611 Authorized Version associate Tobit 4.15 with these New Testament passages in marginal references.

Tobit provides half the New Testament injunction, saying only what one should not do.  The principle is the same:  to test our actions by what we would like others to do to or for us.  See also Sirach 31.15:  “Judge of thy neighbour by thyself: and be discreet in every point.” 

Tobit 7.17
Be of good comfort, my daughter; the Lord of heaven and earth give thee joy for this thy sorrow: be of good comfort, my daughter.
Matthew 11.25
At that time Jesus answered and said, I thank thee, O Father, Lord of heaven and earth, because thou hast hid these things from the wise and prudent, and hast revealed them unto babes.

Luke 10.21
In that hour Jesus rejoiced in spirit, and said, I thank thee, O Father, Lord of heaven and earth, that thou hast hid these things from the wise and prudent, and hast revealed them unto babes: even so, Father; for so it seemed good in thy sight

Acts 17.24
God that made the world and all things therein, seeing that he is Lord of heaven and earth, dwelleth not in temples made with hands

This title for God does not appear explicitly in the Hebrew canon.   “Lord of heaven” is used in Daniel 5.23.
Tobit 12.12
Now therefore, when thou didst pray, and Sara thy daughter in law, I did bring the remembrance of your prayers before the Holy One: and when thou didst bury the dead, I was with thee likewise.
Revelation 8.3
And another angel came and stood at the altar, having a golden censer; and there was given unto him much incense, that he should offer it with the prayers of all saints upon the golden altar which was before the throne.
In Tobit 12.12, the speaker is the angel Raphael, who explains his role in delivering the prayers of the faithful before God.  The angel with the golden censer in Revelation 8.3 does so as well.  It is not clear that any angel is described in the Hebrew canon as having this role.
Tobit 12.15
I am Raphael, one of the seven holy angels, which present the prayers of the saints, and which go in and out before the glory of the Holy One.
Revelation 8.2
And I saw the seven angels which stood before God; and to them were given seven trumpets.
In both passages, seven angels are in God’s presence.  It is not clear that the Hebrew canon anywhere mentions the existence of seven angels who have access to God.
Tobit 13.7, 11
7 Therefore see what he will do with you, and confess him with your whole mouth, and praise the Lord of might, and extol the everlasting King ...
11 Give praise to the Lord, for he is good: and praise the everlasting King, that his tabernacle may be built in thee again with joy 
1 Timothy 1.17
Now unto the King eternal, immortal, invisible, the only wise God, be honour and glory for ever and ever. Amen.
In the Greek, the titles “King eternal” and “everlasting King” are identical.  This title does not appear to have been given to God in the Hebrew canon.
Tobit 13.17
For Jerusalem shall be built up with sapphires and emeralds, and precious stone: thy walls and towers and battlements with pure gold.
Revelation 21.19
19 And the foundations of the wall of the city were garnished with all manner of precious stones. The first foundation was jasper; the second, sapphire; the third, a chalcedony; the fourth, an emerald
Both passages describe a renewed Jerusalem built with precious stones.
Tobit 13.18
And all her streets shall say, Alleluia; and they shall praise him, saying, Blessed be God, which hath extolled it for ever.
Revelation 19.1
And after these things I heard a great voice of much people in heaven, saying, Alleluia; Salvation, and glory, and honour, and power, unto the Lord our God:
Both passages describe the inhabitants of a renewed Jerusalem praising God.
1 Maccabees 4.59
Moreover Judas and his brethren with the whole congregation of Israel ordained, that the days of the dedication of the altar should be kept in their season from year to year by the space of eight days, from the five and twentieth day of the month Casleu, with mirth and gladness.
John 10.22
And it was at Jerusalem the feast of the dedication, and it was winter.
The feast of the dediction mentioned in John’s gospel was instituted during the time of Judas Maccabeus (164 B.C.).  It was celebrated in Chislev, which fell in November/December.  The feast’s modern name is Hanukkah.
1 Maccabees 12.9
Therefore we also, albeit we need none of these things, that we have the holy books of scripture in our hands to comfort us
Romans 15.4
For whatsoever things were written aforetime were written for our learning, that we through patience and comfort of the scriptures might have hope.
Both passages describe the scriptures as a source of comfort
2 Maccabees 2.4-8
4 It was also contained in the same writing, that the prophet, being warned of God, commanded the tabernacle and the ark to go with him, as he went forth into the mountain, where Moses climbed up, and saw the heritage of God. 
5  And when Jeremy came thither, he found an hollow cave, wherein he laid the tabernacle, and the ark, and the altar of incense, and so stopped the door. 
6  And some of those that followed him came to mark the way, but they could not find it. 
7  Which when Jeremy perceived, he blamed them, saying, As for that place, it shall be unknown until the time that God gather his people again together, and receive them unto mercy. 
8  Then shall the Lord shew them these things, and the glory of the Lord shall appear, and the cloud also, as it was shewed under Moses, and as when Solomon desired that the place might be honourably sanctified.
Revelation 11.19
And the temple of God was opened in heaven, and there was seen in his temple the ark of his testament: and there were lightnings, and voices, and thunderings, and an earthquake, and great hail.
In Revelation 11.19, the seventh trumpet has sounded,  voices in heaven have announced that the kingdom of this world has become the kingdom of the Lord and his Christ, and the twenty-four elders have proclaied that the time of judgment has come, the time in which God’s servants receive their rewards.  The passage in 2 Maccabees states that in that future period when the people are gathered into God’s mercy, the ark will be revealed.  John then, by making reference to the unveiling of the ark, punctuates the point that the trumpet and the elders have just made:  the time when God will gather and show mercy to his people has arrived.
2 Maccabees 2.7
7  Which when Jeremy perceived, he blamed them, saying, As for that place, it shall be unknown until the time that God gather his people again together, and receive them unto mercy.
2 Thessalonians 2.1
Now we beseech you, brethren, by the coming of our Lord Jesus Christ, and by our gathering together unto him
Both passages speak of God’s gathering his people.
2 Maccabees 6.18-7.42 Hebrews 11.35
Women received their dead raised to life again: and others were tortured, not accepting deliverance; that they might obtain a better resurrection
This section in 2 Maccabees tells the story of seven brothers who willingly accept martyrdom rather than eat the flesh of pigs.  Their mother, who is witness to their deaths, encourages them with the words, “The Creator of the world ... will in his mercy give life and breath back to you again” (2 Maccabees 7.23), a clear reference to hope in the resurrection.
2 Maccabees 7.19
But think not thou, that takest in hand to strive against God, that thou shalt escape unpunished.
Acts 5.39
But if it be of God, ye cannot overthrow it; lest haply ye be found even to fight against God.
Both passages speak of fighting against God.  The use of this phrase by Gamaliel implies a comparison between the Jewish leaders and Antiochus Epiphanes.
2 Maccabees 9.9
So that the worms rose up out of the body of this wicked man, and whiles he lived in sorrow and pain, his flesh fell away, and the filthiness of his smell was noisome to all his army.
Acts 12.23
And immediately the angel of the Lord smote him, because he gave not God the glory: and he was eaten of worms, and gave up the ghost.
The verse from Maccabees describes the fatal disease of Antiochus Epiphanes.  He had apparently accounted himself God’s equal (2 Maccabees 9.12).  Herod’s fate as described in Acts is similar, as is the cause.
2 Maccabees 12.43-45
43  And when he had made a gathering throughout the company to the sum of two thousand drachms of silver, he sent it to Jerusalem to offer a sin offering, doing therein very well and honestly, in that he was mindful of the resurrection:
44  For if he had not hoped that they that were slain should have risen again, it had been superfluous and vain to pray for the dead.
45  And also in that he perceived that there was great favour laid up for those that died godly, it was an holy and good thought. Whereupon he made a reconciliation for the dead, that they might be delivered from sin.
1 Corinthians 15.29
Else what shall they do which are baptized for the dead, if the dead rise not at all? why are they then baptized for the dead?
Since baptism is an act whereby men are reconciled to God (see Acts 2.37-38, Galatians 3.27, 1 Peter 3.21), it is plausible that those who were baptized for the dead sought to make reconciliation for them, as Judas Maccabeus did for his fallen, idolatrous comrades.
2 Maccabees 13.4
But the King of kings moved Antiochus’ mind against this wicked wretch, and Lysias informed the king that this man was the cause of all mischief, so that the king commanded to bring him unto Berea, and to put him to death, as the manner is in that place.
1 Timothy 6.15
Which in his times he shall shew, who is the blessed and only Potentate, the King of kings, and Lord of lords;

Revelation 17.14
These shall make war with the Lamb, and the Lamb shall overcome them: for he is Lord of lords, and King of kings: and they that are with him are called, and chosen, and faithful.

Revelation 19.16
And he hath on his vesture and on his thigh a name written, KING OF KINGS, AND LORD OF LORDS

The title “King of kings” does not appear as a title for God in the Hebrew Old Testament.  Instead, it is used of Artaxerxes (Ezra 7.12) and of Nebuchadnezzar (Ezekiel 26.7 and Daniel 2.37).
3 Maccabees 5.35
The Jews, having heard of these events, praised the glorious God and King of kings,  because they had obtained this help, too, from him.
1 Timothy 6.15
Which in his times he shall shew, who is the blessed and only Potentate, the King of kings, and Lord of lords;

Revelation 17.14
These shall make war with the Lamb, and the Lamb shall overcome them: for he is Lord of lords, and King of kings: and they that are with him are called, and chosen, and faithful.

Revelation 19.16
And he hath on his vesture and on his thigh a name written, KING OF KINGS, AND LORD OF LORDS

The title “King of kings” does not appear as a title for God in the Hebrew Old Testament.  Instead, it is used of Artaxerxes (Ezra 7.12) and of Nebuchadnezzar (Ezekiel 26.7 and Daniel 2.37).
Wisdom 2.14
He was made to reprove our thoughts.
John 7.7
The world cannot hate you; but me it hateth, because I testify of it, that the works thereof are evil.

Ephesians 5.13
But all things that are reproved are made manifest by the light: for whatsoever doth make manifest is light.

The 1560 Geneva Bible and the 1611 Authorized Version associate Wisdom 2.14 with these New Testament passages in a marginal reference.

The righteous man described in Wisdom is an affront to the wicked.  His mere presence makes them feel guilty.  So also the Son of God shines as light into the darkness and makes the wicked deeds of men manifest.

Wisdom 2.16
We are esteemed of him as counterfeits: he abstaineth from our ways as from filthiness: he pronounceth the end of the just to be blessed, and maketh his boast that God is his father.
John 5.18
Therefore the Jews sought the more to kill him, because he not only had broken the sabbath, but said also that God was his Father, making himself equal with God.
Wisdom 2.12-20 is the speech of wicked men who list their grievances against “the righteous man” whom they plan to “condemn to a shameful death.”  The parallel to the Jewish leaders and Christ is clear.
Wisdom 2.18
For if the just man be the son of God, he will help him, and deliver him from the hand of his enemies.
Matthew 27.43
He trusted in God; let him deliver him now, if he will have him: for he said, I am the Son of God.
The 1560 Geneva Bible and the 1611 Authorized Version associate Wisdom 2.18 with Matthew 27.43 in a marginal reference.  In both instances, evil men test the relationship between a righteous one and God.
Wisdom 3.8
They shall judge the nations, and have dominion over the people, and their Lord shall reign for ever.
1 Corinthians 6.2
Do ye not know that the saints shall judge the world? and if the world shall be judged by you, are ye unworthy to judge the smallest matters?
The 1560 Geneva Bible and the 1611 Authorized Version associate Wisdom 3.8 with 1 Corinthians 6.2 and Matthew 19.28 in a marginal reference.  In both passages, the saints judge the nations.  The passage from Wisdom is a more appropriate reference than  Daniel 7.22, where justice is given to the saints. 
Wisdom 3.9
They that put their trust in him shall understand the truth: and such as be faithful shall abide with him in love: for grace and mercy is to his saints, and he hath care for his elect.
John 15.9-10
9  As the Father hath loved me, so have I loved you: continue ye in my love.
10  If ye keep my commandments, ye shall abide in my love; even as I have kept my Father’s commandments, and abide in his love.
 The faithful, those who keep God's commandments, abide in love.
Wisdom 3.18
Or, if they die quickly, they have no hope, neither comfort in the day of trial.
1 Thessalonians 4.13
But I would not have you to be ignorant, brethren, concerning them which are asleep, that ye sorrow not, even as others which have no hope.
The unrighteous/the unbelievers are both described as without hope.
Wisdom 5.16
Therefore shall they receive a glorious kingdom, and a beautiful crown from the Lord’s hand: for with his right hand shall he cover them, and with his arm shall he protect them.
2 Timothy 4.8
Henceforth there is laid up for me a crown of righteousness, which the Lord, the righteous judge, shall give me at that day: and not to me only, but unto all them also that love his appearing.
Both passages involve the giving of a crown as a reward in the afterlife.
Wisdom 6.18
And love is the keeping of her laws; and the giving heed unto her laws is the assurance of incorruption;
John 14.15
If ye love me, keep my commandments.
Both passages couple love to obedience.
Wisdom 6.18
And love is the keeping of her laws; and the giving heed unto her laws is the assurance of incorruption;
Romans 13.10
Love worketh no ill to his neighbour: therefore love is the fulfilling of the law.
Both passages equate love with obedience.
Wisdom 7.25-26
25  For she is the breath of the power of God, and a pure influence flowing from the glory of the Almighty: therefore can no defiled thing fall into her.
26  For she is the brightness of the everlasting light, the unspotted mirror of the power of God, and the image of his goodness.
Hebrews 1.3
Who being the brightness of his glory, and the express image of his person, and upholding all things by the word of his power, when he had by himself purged our sins, sat down on the right hand of the Majesty on high
The 1560 Geneva Bible associates Wisdom 7.26 with Hebrews 1.3 in a marginal reference.

The Son and Wisdom are described in similar terms: both enjoy the brightness of his glory/light, employ his power, and are the image of his goodness/person.

Wisdom 9.1
O God of my fathers, and Lord of mercy, who hast made all things with thy word
John 1.3
All things were made by him; and without him was not any thing made that was made.
The Logos is responsible for creating all things.
Wisdom 9.15
For the corruptible body presseth down the soul, and the earthy tabernacle weigheth down the mind that museth upon many things.
2 Corinthians 5.1, 4
1  For we know that if our earthly house of this tabernacle were dissolved, we have a building of God, an house not made with hands, eternal in the heavens. ...
4  For we that are in this tabernacle do groan, being burdened: not for that we would be unclothed, but clothed upon, that mortality might be swallowed up of life.
In both passages, the body is described as a tent.  See also Isaiah 38.12.
Wisdom 11.23
But thou hast mercy upon all; for thou canst do all things, and winkest at the sins of men, because they should amend.
Romans 2.4
Or despisest thou the riches of his goodness and forbearance and longsuffering; not knowing that the goodness of God leadeth thee to repentance?
God delays punishment to allow men time to repent.
Wisdom 12.24
For they went astray very far in the ways of error, and held them for gods, which even among the beasts of their enemies were despised, being deceived, as children of no understanding.
Romans 1.23
And changed the glory of the uncorruptible God into an image made like to corruptible man, and to birds, and fourfooted beasts, and creeping things.
The 1560 Geneva Bible and the 1611 Authorized Version associate Wisdom 12.24 with Romans 1.23 in a marginal reference.
Wisdom 13.1
Surely vain are all men by nature, who are ignorant of God, and could not out of the good things that are seen know him that is: neither by considering the works did they acknowledge the workmaster
Romans 1.19
Because that which may be known of God is manifest in them; for God hath shewed it unto them.
The 1560 Geneva Bible associates Wisdom 13.1 with Romans 1.19 in a marginal reference.

Both passages emphasize that creation itself provides sufficient reason for belief in God.

Wisdom 13.1
Surely vain are all men by nature, who are ignorant of God, and could not out of the good things that are seen know him that is: neither by considering the works did they acknowledge the workmaster
Hebrews 11.10
For he looked for a city which hath foundations, whose builder and maker is God.
In both passages, God is described as tecnithV.
Wisdom 15.3
For to know thee is perfect righteousness: yea, to know thy power is the root of immortality.
John 17.3
And this is life eternal, that they might know thee the only true God, and Jesus Christ, whom thou hast sent.
Knowledge of God is eternal life/the root of immortality.
Wisdom 15.7
For the potter, tempering soft earth, fashioneth every vessel with much labour for our service: yea, of the same clay he maketh both the vessels that serve for clean uses, and likewise also all such as serve to the contrary: but what is the use of either sort, the potter himself is the judge.
Romans 9.21
Hath not the potter power over the clay, of the same lump to make one vessel unto honour, and another unto dishonour?
The 1560 Geneva Bible associates Wisdom 15.7 with Romans 9.20 in a marginal reference, but 9.21 is probably meant.  The 1611 Authorized Version associates Wisdom 15.7 with Romans 9.11:  “(For the children being not yet born, neither having done any good or evil, that the purpose of God according to election might stand, not of works, but of him that calleth;)”.
Wisdom 18.14
For while all things were in quiet silence, and that night was in the midst of her swift course,
Revelation 8.1
And when he had opened the seventh seal, there was silence in heaven about the space of half an hour.
Silence before the plagues on Egypt/ silence before the plagues on the earth.
Sirach 1.10
She is with all flesh according to his gift, and he hath given her to them that love him
1 Corinthians 2.9
But as it is written, Eye hath not seen, nor ear heard, neither have entered into the heart of man, the things which God hath prepared for them that love him.
Sirach is discussing how God gives Wisdom as a gift to those who love him.  Paul’s point in 1 Corinthians is that he imparts “secret and hidden wisdom of God”  to the mature.  Paul’s use of the phrase “it is written” signals a direct quotation, but the source is not clear in this case.  The ending seems to rely on Sirach 1.10.
Sirach 1.25
The parables of knowledge are in the treasures of wisdom: but godliness is an abomination to a sinner.
Colossians 2.3
in whom are hid all the treasures of wisdom and knowledge.
Both employ the phrase “treasuries of wisdom.”
Sirach 2.5
For gold is tried in the fire, and acceptable men in the furnace of adversity.
1 Peter 1.7
That the trial of your faith, being much more precious than of gold that perisheth, though it be tried with fire, might be found unto praise and honour and glory at the appearing of Jesus Christ
Proverbs 17.3 does equally well
Sirach 4.31
Let not thine hand be stretched out to receive, and shut when thou shouldest repay.
Acts 20.35
I have shewed you all things, how that so labouring ye ought to support the weak, and to remember the words of the Lord Jesus, how he said, It is more blessed to give than to receive.
The 1560 Geneva Bible associates Sirach 4.31 with Acts 20.35 in a marginal reference.

Both passages stress giving over receiving.

Sirach 5.11
Be swift to hear; and let thy life be sincere; and with patience give answer.
James 1.19
Wherefore, my beloved brethren, let every man be swift to hear, slow to speak, slow to wrath:
The 1611 Authorized Version associates Sirach 5.11 with James 1.19 in a marginal note.
Sirach 7.14
Use not many words in a multitude of elders, and make not much babbling when thou prayest.
Matthew 6.7
But when ye pray, use not vain repetitions, as the heathen do: for they think that they shall be heard for their much speaking.
The 1611 Authorized Version associates Sirach 7.14 with Matthew 6.5, 7 in a marginal note.

Both passages forbid babbling or vain repetitions.

Sirach 7.32-35
32  And stretch thine hand unto the poor, that thy blessing may be perfected.
33  A gift hath grace in the sight of every man living; and for the dead detain it not.
34  Fail not to be with them that weep, and mourn with them that mourn.
35  Be not slow to visit the sick: for that shall make thee to be beloved.
Matthew 25.36
Naked, and ye clothed me: I was sick, and ye visited me: I was in prison, and ye came unto me.
The 1560 Geneva Bible associates Sirach 7.35 with Matthew 25.36 in a marginal reference.

Both passages encourage visitations to the sick.

Sirach 7.34
34  Fail not to be with them that weep, and mourn with them that mourn.
Romans 12.15
Rejoice with them that do rejoice, and weep with them that weep.
The 1560 Geneva Bible associates Sirach 7.34 with Romans 12.15 in a marginal reference.
Sirach 10.14
The Lord hath cast down the thrones of proud princes, and set up the meek in their stead.
Luke 1.52
He hath put down the mighty from their seats, and exalted them of low degree.
The parallelism between these passages is apparent.
Sirach 11.19
Whereas he saith, I have found rest, and now will eat continually of my goods; and yet he knoweth not what time shall come upon him, and that he must leave those things to others, and die.
Luke 12.19
And I will say to my soul, Soul, thou hast much goods laid up for many years; take thine ease, eat, drink, and be merry.
The 1560 Geneva Bible and the 1611 Authorized Version associate Sirach 11.19 with Luke 12.19 in a marginal reference.

The verse from Sirach quotes a rich man (Sirach 11.18), as is the man in Jesus’s parable of the rich fool.

Sirach 15.11-20
11  Say not thou, It is through the Lord that I fell away: for thou oughtest not to do the things that he hateth.
12  Say not thou, He hath caused me to err: for he hath no need of the sinful man.
13  The Lord hateth all abomination; and they that fear God love it not.
14  He himself made man from the beginning, and left him in the hand of his counsel;
15  If thou wilt, to keep the commandments, and to perform acceptable faithfulness.
16  He hath set fire and water before thee: stretch forth thy hand unto whether thou wilt.
17  Before man is life and death; and whether him liketh shall be given him.
18  For the wisdom of the Lord is great, and he is mighty in power, and beholdeth all things:
19  And his eyes are upon them that fear him, and he knoweth every work of man.
20  He hath commanded no man to do wickedly, neither hath he given any man licence to sin.
James 1.13
Let no man say when he is tempted, I am tempted of God: for God cannot be tempted with evil, neither tempteth he any man:
The accusation against God is stronger in Sirach than in James, but the assertion of God’s guiltlessness is the same.
Sirach 16.21
It is a tempest which no man can see: for the most part of his works are hid.
John 3.8
The wind bloweth where it listeth, and thou hearest the sound thereof, but canst not tell whence it cometh, and whither it goeth: so is every one that is born of the Spirit.
In the passage from Sirach, God’s workings are compared to an invisible tempest.  The figure of the invisible wind is also used by Jesus to describe the workings of the Holy Spirit.
Sirach 24.21
They that eat me shall yet be hungry, and they that drink me shall yet be thirsty.
John 6.35
And Jesus said unto them, I am the bread of life: he that cometh to me shall never hunger; and he that believeth on me shall never thirst.
John 6.35 appears to be an allusion by contrast.
Sirach 28.2
Forgive thy neighbour the hurt that he hath done unto thee, so shall thy sins also be forgiven when thou prayest.
Matthew 6.12
And forgive us our debts, as we forgive our debtors.
Both passages tie God’s forgiveness with our forgiveness of the sins of others.
Sirach 28.7
Remember the commandments, and bear no malice to thy neighbour: remember the covenant of the Highest, and wink at ignorance.
Acts 17.30
And the times of this ignorance God winked at; but now commandeth all men every where to repent:
The verses speak of winking at ignorance.  It may be that Paul picked up the expression from Sirach.  In the Greek, the resemblance is less obvious than in English, but is still unmistakable.
Sirach 28.12
If thou blow the spark, it shall burn: if thou spit upon it, it shall be quenched: and both these come out of thy mouth.
James 3.10
Out of the same mouth proceedeth blessing and cursing. My brethren, these things ought not so to be.
Both passages play upon the thought that the mouth is the source of opposites.
Sirach 29.10
Lose thy money for thy brother and thy friend, and let it not rust under a stone to be lost.
James 5.3
Your gold and silver is cankered; and the rust of them shall be a witness against you, and shall eat your flesh as it were fire. Ye have heaped treasure together for the last days.
Both passages employ the image of rusting money.
Sirach 29.10-12
10  Lose thy money for thy brother and thy friend, and let it not rust under a stone to be lost.
11  Lay up thy treasure according to the commandments of the most High, and it shall bring thee more profit than gold.
12  Shut up alms in thy storehouses: and it shall deliver thee from all affliction.
Matthew 6.20
But lay up for yourselves treasures in heaven, where neither moth nor rust doth corrupt, and where thieves do not break through nor steal:
The 1611 Authorized Version associates Sirach 29.11 with Matthew 6.20, Luke 11.41 and 12.33, Acts 10.4, and 1 Timothy 6.18, 19 in a marginal note.
Sirach 37.2
Is it not a grief unto death, when a companion and friend is turned to an enemy?
Matthew 26.38
Then saith he unto them, My soul is exceeding sorrowful, even unto death: tarry ye here, and watch with me.

Mark 14.34
And saith unto them, My soul is exceeding sorrowful unto death: tarry ye here, and watch.

The passage in Sirach treats of false friends.  In the quotations from Matthew and Mark, Jesus is about to be betrayed by one of his friends.  Both Sirach and the Gospels associate this sorrow of betrayal with death.
Sirach 37.28
For all things are not profitable for all men, neither hath every soul pleasure in every thing.
1 Corinthians 6.12
All things are lawful unto me, but all things are not expedient: all things are lawful for me, but I will not be brought under the power of any.

1 Corinthians 10.23
All things are lawful for me, but all things are not expedient: all things are lawful for me, but all things edify not.

The Greek is closer than the English here (expedient = profitable = sumferei).  Sirach warns against doing things that are bad for you, which is Paul’s point as well, although, in contrast to Sirach, he is concerned with repercussions more serious than those associated with overeating.
Sirach 40.15
The children of the ungodly shall not bring forth many branches: but are as unclean roots upon a hard rock.
Matthew 13.5
Some fell upon stony places, where they had not much earth: and forthwith they sprung up, because they had no deepness of earth:

Mark 4.5
And some fell on stony ground, where it had not much earth; and immediately it sprang up, because it had no depth of earth:

The figure of a plant on rocky soil is common to both passages, but the application is rather different.  For Jesus, the plant on rocky soil stands for those who receive the good news but fall away during tribulation.  Sirach simply wishes to point out the fruitlessness of the wicked.
Sirach 44.21
Therefore he assured him by an oath, that he would bless the nations in his seed, and that he would multiply him as the dust of the earth, and exalt his seed as the stars, and cause them to inherit from sea to sea, and from the river unto the utmost part of the earth.
Romans 4.13
For the promise, that he should be the heir of the world, was not to Abraham, or to his seed, through the law, but through the righteousness of faith.
The 1560 Geneva Bible and the 1611 Authorized Version associate Sirach 44.21 with Galatians 3.8 in a marginal reference.  Gal 3.8:  “And the Scripture foreseeing that God would justify the heathen through faith, preached before the Gospel unto Abraham, saying, In thee shall all nations be blessed.”

Sirach 44.21 may be the source for Paul’s view that Abraham was “heir of the world.”

Sirach 48.10
Who wast ordained for reproofs in their times, to pacify the wrath of the Lord’s judgment, before it brake forth into fury, and to turn the heart of the father unto the son, and to restore the tribes of Jacob.
Matthew 17.11
And Jesus answered and said unto them, Elias truly shall first come, and restore all things.
Both passages are plainly about Elijah.  The notion of restoration is common to both as well, and to Malachi 3.23 (LXX): “who shall restore the heart of the father to the son, and the heart of a man to his neighbour,  lest I come and smite the earth utterly.”  It is difficult to know whether the passage from Sirach or the one from Malachi was foremost in Jesus’s mind here. 
Sirach 51.26
26  Put your neck under the yoke, and let your soul receive instruction: she is hard at hand to find.
27  Behold with your eyes, how that I have but little labour, and have gotten unto me much rest.
Matthew 11.28
28  Come unto me, all ye that labour and are heavy laden, and I will give you rest.
29  Take my yoke upon you, and learn of me; for I am meek and lowly in heart: and ye shall find rest unto your souls.
Jesus described himself in a way that is reminiscent of Sirach’s description of Wisdom.