Isaiah 7.14
Septuagint

Diatouto dwsei KurioV autoV umin shmeion: 
idou h parqenoV en gastri
lhyetai, 
kai texetai uion, 
kai kaleseiV to onoma autou
Emmanouhl

New Testament - Matthew 1.23


idou h parqenoV en gastri
 exei 
kai texetai uion, 
kai kalesousin to onoma autou 
Emmanouhl, 
o estin meqermhneuomenon meq  hmwn o qeoV

Septuagint

Therefore the Lord himself shall give you a sign; behold, a virgin shall conceive in the womb, and shall bring forth a son, and thou shalt call his name Emmanuel

New Testament

Behold, the virgin shall be with child, and shall bring forth a son, And they shall call his name Immanuel, which is, being interpreted, God with us 

Masoretic Text

Therefore the Lord himself will give you a sign:  behold, a virgin shall conceive, and bear a son, and shall call his name Immanuel 

Comments:  The RSV translates Isaiah 7.14 as follows, “Therefore the Lord himself shall give you a sign.  Behold, a young woman shall conceive and bear a son, and shall call his name Immanuel.”  The Hebrew word here is almah, which means a young woman.  Whether ‘almah’ necessarily implied virginity has long been a point of controversy. 

The Septuagint reading given above contains a different verb (lhyetai) than the New Testament (exei).  Note that Brenton’s Septuagint relies on Codex Vaticanus.  If Codex Alexandrinus is used instead, the New Testament and the Septuagint agree on this point.

The agreement between the New Testament and the Septuagint in this passage is even greater when New Testament variants are considered.  Some New Testament witnesses read “you shall call his name,” as in the Septuagint:  Codex D, a few Greek and some Bohairic manuscripts, Origen and Eusebius.