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Jacob Piersol was born in Chester County, Pa., and moved to the Pittsburgh area just before the start of the American Revolution.  He died about 1780.  The only man who can be proved to be his son was John Piersol, who lived in the Pittsburgh area during the late 1700s.  However, records show that Jacob had at least one other son and it appears to be virtually certain that he had at four sons who great to maturity. They were:
+ John Piersol of Allegheny County, Pa., born about 1760.
+ Sampson Piersol of Beaver County, Pa., born in 1764.
+ Jacob Piersol of Beaver County, Pa., born in 1769.
+ Peter Piersol of Beaver County, Pa., and Fulton County, Ill., born in1780.
For information on the elder Jacob Piersol, please click here.
For information on Sampson, please click here.
For information on the other three men, continue reading.
For a rundown of the sources on this family, please click here.
Brian Bowers
 
 

SONS OF JACOB PIERSOL

JOHN PEIRSOL
John Piersol was born about 1760 in Chester County, Pa., to Jacob and Ann (Babb) Piersol. (1)
Possibly married Hannah Stilley, daughter of Jacob Stilley. (2)
Children: Undetermined. However, if Hannah Stilley was, indeed, his wife, John had three children, including a son named John. (3)
John’s family originally lived in Chester County, Pa. However, they moved to the area around Pittsburgh about 1772.
Jacob appears to have died in 1780 – probably killed in an attack by Native Americans. John’s mother died soon afterward. Since John served as the administrator of their estate, it seems likely that he took responsibility for their household and his younger siblings. No Piersol appears in the 1781 tax lists for Washington County, which covered the area in which the family lived. However, a "John Person" is listed in the Peters Township tax lists as owning no land, a horse, a cow and a sheep. (4)
During the Revolutionary War, most men were required to serve in the local militia. In the Pittsburgh area, the militia was usually called into service when Native American allies of the British raided the western settlements. Many men also patrolled the frontiers as rangers to ward off such raids. John Pearsall is listed among rangers on the frontiers of Pennsylvania during the Revolutionary War. (5)
In June 1782, Pvt. John Piersol was a member of Capt. Andrew Hood’s company during Col. Crawford’s ill-fated expedition against Native Americans at Sandusky. The army marched against Indian settlements follow raids but was soundly defeated in western Ohio. (6)
John Piercall, private, is listed among "soldiers who received depreciation pay as per cancelled certificates on file in the Division of Public Records." Depreciation pay was given to Revolutionary War soldiers to balance the decline in value of the funds in which they were originally paid. (7)
Following the war, Native Americans continued to be a threat to the frontier settlements and John continued to serve in the militia. John Persall is listed as an ensign of the 4th Company, 1st Battalion of Allegheny County Militia, commissioned May 1, 1792, as listed in the executive minutes of Gov. Thomas Mifflin. (8)
In the 1790 Census, Jno Pearceall’s household contained one male over 16 years old, one male under 16 years old and four females. It is uncertain how many of these were his own children and how many, if any, were younger siblings. John is listed in the "Portion of Allegheny County taken from Washington County."
In 1791, John appears in the tax list for Mifflin Township, Allegheny County, Pa. (9)
John seems to drop out of the records during the 1790s. He may have died or moved out of state because I have not found him in Pennsylvania census records in 1800. If he was, indeed, the husband of Hannah Stilley, he was certainly dead by 1801. (10)
(1) Following Jacob’s death, John handled the administration of his estate, according to Washington County, Pa., Accounts, File P, No. 5. The papers mention that John paid for "father’s coffin." "The History and Genealogy of the Pearsall Family in England and America," edited by Clarence Pearsall, 1928, states that John was the son of Benjamin Pierceall, but this is incorrect, as is proved by the estate papers. The Pearsall history, which contains other errors concerning John, mentions him on Page 1444, Chapter 49, Section 2. Jacob appears in Chester County tax records from 1760 to 1771. Jacob seems to have been married around 1760, which is the year when Ann Piershal was disowned by a Quaker meeting in for being married by a priest, according to "Early Church Records of Chester County, Pennsylvania, Vol. 1, Quaker Records of Bradford Monthly Meeting," by Martha Reamy, pages 149-150. For a detailed discussion of Jacob’s life in Chester County, please see his narrative. (2) Records concerning the heirs of Jacob Stilley mention a John Percival or Purcell, who was the deceased husband of Jacob’s daughter, Hannah. The also mention that a few years later John Piersol received part of the inheritance. Presumably, John Piersol is the son of the John and Hannah Percival/Purcell in the original records. In September 1801, Allegheny County, Pa., orphan’s court records mention Jacob’s children, including "Hannah (decd.), widow of John Percival, who left three children." On March 23, 1802, a second record mentions "Hannah Purcell … widow of John Purcell (decd.)" On June 10, 1815, John Piersol submitted a receipt for the amount due for his share of the estate. [The abstract of the first record seems to indicate that both Hannah and her husband were dead and the second might indicate the same, which could explain why the surname is spelled so many different ways. That possibility would add credibility to the "Piersol" listing from 1815 because it represents someone who might be able to confirm or correct the name’s spelling.] This information is contained in docket page 64, #275, as recorded in "Allegheny County, Pennsylvania, Vol. I: Orphan’s Court Docket I, Allegheny County, Pa., 1789-1820," abstracted by KTH McFarland, page 28 (1801 record) and 29 (1802 and 1815 records). I have found no proof that John was the husband of "Sarah Custard, daughter of George Custard and sister of Noah Custard," as stated in the Pearsall history. (3) The 1790 Census indicates that John’s household contained a boy under 16 and four females, presumably including his wife. See footnote No. 2 for a discussion of a possible son. (4) "Pennsylvania Archives," Series 3, Vol. 22, page 760. (5) "Pennsylvania Archives," Series 3, Vol. 23, page 217. (6) "Pennsylvania Archives," Series 6, Vol. 2, page 393. (7) "Pennsylvania Archives," Series 5, Vol. 4, page 416. (A second listing for John Piersall on the same page almost certainly reflects the fact that his name was spelled differently on two certificates for two separate duties.) (8) "Pennsylvania Archives," Series 9, Vol. 1, page 281. (9) "Pennsylvania Archives," Series 3, Vol. 22, page 649. (10) A John appears in nearby Mahoning County, Ohio, in the early 1800s but he was a son of the William Peirsol who lived in Fayette County, Pa.


JACOB PIERSOL
Jacob Piersol was born about 1769, probably in Chester County to Jacob and Ann (Babb) Piersol. (1)
Married a woman named Elizabeth, who was born about 1772 in Pennsylvania. (2)
Children: (3)
Ann. Married George Hinds.
Mary. Married Sampson Hind.
John, born July 13, 1801.
Samuel, born about 1804.
Sampson, born about 1807.
Sarah. Married Jesse Meoor.
George, born about 1811.
Elizabeth. Married Samuel Cookson.
Ruth. Married Joseph Hennon.
Jacob, born about 1815.
During the early 1800s, Jacob lived in North Sewickley Township, Beaver County, Pa. In the 1800 Census, he is listed in Sewickley Township with his household containing one male 26-45, one female under 10 and one female 26-45. Starting in 1802, he appears in the tax records of North Sewickley Township. In 1803, he was taxed for 150 acres, a horse and two cows. The 1810 Census indicates that his household contained three males under 10, a male 16-26, a male 26-45, a female under 10, two females 10-16, a female 16-26 and a female 26-45. In 1815, Jacob was taxed for 150 acres, two horses and two cows. (4)
In the 1850 Census, Jacob is listed in New Sewickley Township. He owned property valued at $2,000. His household included Elizabeth and Jacob Jr. and his new wife Eliza.
Jacob probably died in late 1857 because his will was recorded Nov. 3, 1857.
(1) "The History and Genealogy of the Pearsall Family In England and America," edited by Clarence Pearsall, 1928, page 1447, states that Jacob was the son of John Piersol but that is not possible. Jacob Peirsol is listed in the 1850 Census of New Sewickley Township, Beaver County, Pa. The census indicates that he was 81 years old and had been born in Pennsylvania. If Jacob was born in 1769, he could not have been the son of John Peirsol, who was probably born about 1760. As mentioned in comments above, John was the son of the Jacob Pearcil, who died in Washington County, Pa., about 1780. John was the administrator of Jacob’s estate and papers mention that he paid for "father’s coffin," according to Washington County, Pa., Accounts, File P, No. 5. Jacob seems to have been married around 1760, which is the year when Ann Piershal was disowned by a Quaker meeting in for being married by a priest, according to "Early Church Records of Chester County, Pennsylvania, Vol. 1, Quaker Records of Bradford Monthly Meeting," by Martha Reamy, pages 149-150. It seems certain that the younger Jacob was actually another son of the elder Jacob. The Washington County estate papers also indicate that Jacob had young children, including at least one young son. Only two Piersol/Pearsall families appear in western Pennsylvania: Jacob’s family and that of Benjamin Pearsall. Benjamin can be ruled out as Jacob’s father because he was born in 1753 and too young to have had a son in 1769. (Benjamin’s year of birth is listed in his Revolutionary War Pension application – S40251.) Additionally, Jacob lived near Sampson Piersol (Chapter 50, Section 1) and Peter Piersol (Chapter 51, Section 2) in northern Beaver County, according to census records and tax records in "Beaver County’s Earliest Residents," by Publishers of Beaver County Records, Helen G. Clear and Mae H. Winne. It seems almost certain that Jacob, Sampson and Peter were brothers. (2) 1850 Census of New Sewickley Township, Beaver County, Pa. The Pearsall history states he married "Elizabeth Savage. She is said to be the daughter of George Savage of Chester County, Pennsylvania. The family originally came from Maryland where Edward Savage and William Savage were in Dorchester County, before 1672." I have not been able to check into the matter yet. (3) Jacob’s children are listed in his will, which appears in Beaver County Will Book C, page 257. John’s birth date appears in "Beaver County Cemeteries," Vol. 1, by Bob and Mary Closson, page 69. Samuel, Sampson and Jacob Jr.’s approximate birth years come from the 1860 and 1870 Censuses of New Swickley Township, Beaver County, Pa. George’s approximate birth year comes from the 1850 Census of New Swickley Township, Beaver County, Pa. (4) The tax records are in (1802-1808 and 1810) "Beaver County’s Earliest Residents," by Publishers of Beaver County Records, Helen G. Clear and Mae H. Winne. Additional information on 1803 appears in "Gleanings, Beaver County Genealogical Society, Pa." Vol. XIV No. 2/3. Information on 1815 appears in "Gleanings," Beaver County Genealogical Society, Pa., Vol. XV No. 2.
NOTE: The Pearsall history mentions that Jacob served in a militia unit during the War of 1812. However, it seems likely that the Pvt. Jacob Peirical listed as serving in the 26th Regiment of Pennsylvania Militia during the War of 1812 was the son of Sampson Piersol, who was probably the elder Jacob’s brother. I have not found any pension records that refer to service by a Jacob so it’s hard to prove one way or the other. However, it seems that a 45-year-old was less likely to serve than a 29-year-old who had been married less than five years. The muster roll appears in "Pennsylvania Archives," Series 6, Vol. 10, page 132. It mentions Pvt. Jacob Peirical was paid $11.66 for 1 month, 5 days of service in Capt. Armstrong Drennon’s company of the 1st Battalion, 26th Regiment of Pennsylvania Militia, "doing duty at Erie," Feb. 16 to March 22, 1814.


PETER PIERSOL
Peter Piersol was born in 1780 near Pittsburgh, Pa., probably the son of Jacob and Ann (Babb) Piersol. (1)
Married a woman named Sarah in 1802 or 1803. Sarah was born in the early 1780s in Pennsylvania. (2)
Children included Joel, born in 1804, and John H., born in 1821. Peter reportedly was "father of thirteen children – six sons and seven daughters – of whom twelve lived to maturity, one died in infancy." (3)
Peter was born during the Revolutionary War and Jacob Piersol – who was apparently Peter’s father – served in a Virginia Regiment that was stationed at Fort Pitt. Jacob was discharged in the spring of 1780, probably in March, after serving a three-year enlistment. Unfortunately, soon after his discharged, Jacob died in an attack on the frontier settlements by Native Americans allied with the British. It appears that he died in April 1780 because that is when his account at a local merchant ends, according to his estate papers. That month also corresponds to a major raid by Native Americans that killed between 40 and 50 people in Western Pennsylvania. (4)
Peter birth date is not known. However, one source – unfortunately, a very unreliable source – states that Peter was actually born after his father’s death. Because of the timing of Jacob’s discharge and death, that seems very likely. (5)
It appears that Peter’s mother also died soon afterward because John Piersol, Jacob’s son, said for a coffin for his mother in May 1781, according to Jacob’s estate papers.
The young orphan appears to have been taken into the households of his brothers, who appear to have been John, Sampson (born 1764) and Jacob (born 1769). For example, Sampson appears to have had only one son but the 1790 Census of Allegheny County, Pa., shows two males under age 16 living in his household. In 1800, Sampson’s household in Sewickley Township, Beaver County, Pa., contained two males ages 10-16. Although Peter would have turned 20 in 1800, it seems likely that he was the "extra" male in Sampson’s household.
In 1802, Peter makes his first appears in records – listed as a single male living in North Sewickley Township, Beaver County, near both Jacob and Sampson Piersol. (6)
Later that year or early the next, Peter married Sarah. The 1803 tax list no longer lists him as a single man. In that year, he was taxed for 130 acres, a horse and a cow. (7) Peter continues to appear in North Sewickley tax records until 1815, when he was taxed for 50 acres, a horse, two cows and a yoke of oxen. (8)
Soon after this, Peter and his family decided to head west. Peter Persol is listed in the 1820 Census of Salt Creek Township, Wayne County, Ohio. His household contained a male under 10, a male 10-16, a male 16-18, a male 16-26, a male 45 or older, three females under 10, two females 10-16, a female 16-26 and a female 26-45.
A good deal of information on Peter is provided in a biographical note on his son Joel Peirsol, which appears in "The 1871 Atlas Map of Fulton County, Illinois." It states that Peter lived in Pennsylvania "until 1818, when he moved to Ohio and settled in Holmes county, where he resided until 1836, when he moved with his family to Illinois and settled on section 21, in Lee township, Fulton county, and lived there until about 1851, when he moved to Fairview and lived about four years, when he moved to Lewistown, and lived there until his death, which was in 1859. … Mr. Peirsol in his young days was a mechanic, but his principal business was farming and raising stock. He was a man that held many offices of trust, and died, as he had lived, in the confidence of all that knew him." (9)
In the 1850 Census, Peter Pearsoll appears in Lee, Fulton County, Ill. He was 70 years old and had been born in Pennsylvania. He was a farmer and owned property valued at $600. His wife was Sarah, age 68, also born in Pennsylvania. Nearby was his son Joel a 46-year-old farmer who had been born in Pennsylvania.
Sarah died in Sarah died in 1858 and Peter died in 1859.
(1) The 1850 Census of Lee, Fulton County, Ill, indicates that Peter Pearsoll was 70 years old and had been born in Pennsylvania. "The 1871 Atlas Map of Fulton County, Illinois," by Andreas, Lyter, and Co., Page 35, says "Petter Peirsol … was born in Pennsylvania in the year 1780." "The History of the Pearsall Family in England and America," edited by Clarence Pearsall, 1928, page 1460, states that Peter was the son of Benjamin Peirsol. However, the only Benjamin who lived in the Pittsburgh area in 1780 later moved to Monroe County, Ohio. This is significant because numerous sources state that Peter’s father was killed by Native Americans about the time of Peter’s birth. Aside from Benjamin, the only adult Piersols in the Pittsburgh area in 1780 were Jacob Piersol and his son John. Jacob died in 1780, which would match up well with the Fulton County atlas, which says of Peter’s son Joel, "His grandfather Peirsol was killed by the Indians in the year 1780, within eleven miles of Pittsburg." Peter was almost certainly named after his grandfather – Peter Babb. Peter’s father, Jacob, appears to have married Ann Babb, the daughter of Peter Babb of West Caln Township, Chester County. For additional information on this link to the Babbs, see Jacob’s narrative. (2) 1850 Census of Lee, Fulton County, Ill., says she was 68 and born in Pennsylvania. The Fulton County atlas says, "Mrs. Peirsol was born in 1784 and died in 1858." The Pearsall history states Peter married "Sarah Lutton, widow of Hines and daughter of Robert Lutton, and near neighbor of Benjamin Peirsol in Allegheny County." "History of Fulton County, Illinois," by C.C. Chapman & Co., pages 806-807, lists her name as "Sarah (Hains) Peirsol." (3) Joel’s birth year and number of children are mentioned in "The 1871 Atlas Map of Fulton County, Illinois." According to the Pearsall history, Peter’s children were: Joel, born May 22, 1804; Elizabeth, born Jan. 29, 1803; Prudence, married Harrison Rigdon; Nancy, married Stephen Adkins; Sally, married Asa Munn; Ann, married Jefferson Luke; Sampson; John H., born 1821; Hannah, married Hilman Otis; Mary, married John Russell; Peter. The information about John H. Peirsol appears in "History of Fulton County, Illinois," by C.C. Chapman & Co., pages 806-807. (4) Jacob Persal enlisted for a three-year commitment on March 22, 1777, so he was probably discharged in March 1780. The enlistment date is mentioned in "Compiled Service Records of Soldiers Who Served in the American Army During the Revolutionary War: Virginia 9th Regiment," microfilm M881, roll 1060, National Archives. Jacob’s estate papers appears in Washington County, Pa., Account, File P, No. 5. The raid is mentioned in "The Indian Wars of Pennsylvania," by C. Hale Sipe, page 608. (5) This information appears in a biographical item on John C. Peirsol of Monroe Township, Monroe County, Mo., which was published in "History of Monroe County" in 1884 and is available on the Monroe County RootsWeb Internet site at www.RootsWeb.com/~momonroe/history/chapter19.htm. It reads: "Mr. Peirsol’s great-grandfather, Peter Peirsol, was killed at Ft. Duquesne in 1753, when under the command of Washington, at the time the English or Americans were driven from that fort by the French and Indians. Peter Peirsol, Jr., was born after his father’s death, and he became the father of Mr. Peirsol’s father, Joel Peirsol. Joel Peirsol was born in Berks county, Pennsylvania." Almost every detail in this account should be doubted. It identifies Peter’s father as an elder Peter. However, that’s impossible. First of all, the only other Peter I’ve been able to find in Pennsylvania records from 1750 to 1780 spent his life in Chester County in eastern Pennsylvania. Next, the 1850 Census indicates that Peter "Jr." was born in 1780, not 1753. It seems likely that Joel’s son John heard stories about the raid by Native Americans equated all "Indian troubles" in the Pittsburgh area with the French and Indian War. Finally, there is no evidence to suggest that Peter ever lived in Berks County, Pa., so it seems very unlikely that Joel was born there. In fact, Peter Persol is listed in the 1804 tax list for North Sewickley Township, Beaver County, Pa., according to "Beaver County’s Earliest Residents," by Publishers of Beaver County Records, Helen G. Clear and Mae H. Winne, page 29. (6) "Beaver County’s Earliest Residents," by Publishers of Beaver County Records, Helen G. Clear and Mae H. Winne, page 11. (7) "Gleanings," Beaver County Genealogical Society, Pa., Vol. XIV No. 2/3. (8) "Gleanings," Beaver County Genealogical Society, Pa., Vol. XV No. 2. (9) Unlikely other secondary sources related to Peter, this item seems pretty reliable because it discusses items that Joel would have been in a position to know first-hand. In addition, the statements that I have been able to check against original documents proved to be reliable.



GRANDSONS OF JACOB PIERSOL
Click here for information on Sampson Piersol's children.

JOHN PIERSOL
John Piersol was born July 13, 1801, in Pennsylvania, to Jacob and Elizabeth Piersol. (1)
Married a woman named Naomi. She was born July 24, 1801. (2)
Children: (3)
Sarah, born about 1829.
Margaret, born about 1831. Probably married a man named Noonen or Neueman.
Jacob, born about 1833.
Samuel, born about 1835.
Harrison, born about 1836.
George, born about 1838 or 1840.
Nelson, born about 1840. (A John who would have been born about 1842 appears between George and James in the 1860 Census. This would seem to be Nelson.)
James, born about 1844.
In the 1850 Census, John Piersol is listed in New Sewickley Township, Beaver County Pa. He was a farmer who owned real estate valued at $4,000. His household also contained: Naomi, age 49; Sarah, 21; Margaret, 19; Jacob, 17; Samuel, 15; Harrison, 14; George, 12; Nelson, 10; James, 6.
In the 1860 Census, John Piersol appears in New Sewickley Township, Beaver County, Pa. He was a farmer who owned real estate valued at $4,000 and personal property valued at $1,226. His household also contained Naomi, 59; George, 20, a farm hand; John, 18; James 16; Margt. Noonen, 25, who owned $1,000 in real estate; and James, 2. It appears that Margaret was John’s widowed daughter.
In the 1870 Census, John Pearsoll again appears in New Sewickley Township. He was a farmer who owned real estate valued at $9,100 and personal property valued at $1,000. His household contained Naomi, age 68, at home; Margaret Neuman, 35; and James Neuman, 12.
John died June 5, 1875. Naomi died Feb. 27, 1883. They are buried at Mount Pleasant Cemetery in Marion Township, Beaver County.
(1) Birth date appears in "Beaver County Cemeteries," Vol. 1, by Bob and Mary Closson, page 69. Connection to father is through Jacob’s will in Beaver County, Pa., Will Book C, page 257. In the 1800 Census, Jacob is listed in Sewickley Township, Beaver County. (2) Birth date appears in the cemetery book. The 1860 Census of New Sewickley Township says she was born in Virginia but the 1870 Census of New Sewickley Township says she was born in Pennsylvania. "The History and Genealogy of the Pearsall Family in England and America," edited by Clarence Pearsall, 1928, page 1447, states that John "married May 26, 1825, Naomi Mace, daughter of Jacob Mace and his wife Elizabeth Heath; born July 24, 1801; died February 27, 1883." (3) 1860 and 1870 censuses of New Sewickley Township, Beaver County, Pa. The Pearsall history provides the following information on their children: Elizabeth, born Feb. 26, 1826; married Detmer B. Shanor; Mary Ann, born Sept. 1, 1827, married first, James Burns, and married second, Phillip Lides; Sarah, born Sept. 6, 1829, married William Humes; Margaret, born Aug. 6, 1831, married James Noonan; Jacob Babb, born May 1, 1833; Samuel Heath, born April 13, 1835, and died unmarried April 1852; Sampson Harrison, born Sept. 30, 1836; George Wesley, born Nov. 25, 1839; John Nelson, born Nov. 25, 1841; and James Kastor, born Sept. 21, 1843. James Kastor served in the Union cavalry during the Civil War and earn the Medal of Honor.


SAMUEL PIERSOL
Samuel Piersol was born about 1804 in Pennsylvania to Jacob and Elizabeth Piersol. (1)
Married Hannah, who was born in 1802 in Pennsylvania. (2)
Children: (3)
Elizabeth, born about 1831.
Mary, born about 1834.
Hannah, born about 1836.
Ruth, born about 1839.
Jacob C., born about 1841 or 1843.
Nancy, born about 1846.
In the 1850 Census, Samuel Piersol appears in New Sewickley Township, Beaver County, Pa. He was a farmer who owned real estate valued at $2,800. His household also contained Hannah, age 48; Elizabeth, 19; Mary, 16; Hannah, 14; Ruth, 11; Jacob C., 9; and Nancy, 4
In the 1860 Census, Sam Piersol is listed as a farmer who owned real estate valued at $2,500 and personal property valued at $1,020. His household also contained: Hannah; Jacob, 17, a farm hand; Nancy, 14; Wm. Cochran, 32, a carpenter; Sarah Cochran, 20; and Mary Cochran, 6 months. According to "The History and Genealogy of the Pearsall Family in England and America," the girl listed as Ruth in the 1850 Census was named "Sara Ruth" and she married William Cochran.
In the 1870 Census, Saml Pearsoll is listed as "Gentleman" – a retired farmer – who lived with Hannah in the household of Thos Morgan, blacksmith, 64, in New Sewickley Township. Although he lived in someone else’s home he is listed as owning real estate valued at $500 and personal property valued at $8,000.
(1) Samuel is listed as a son in Jacob Piersol’s will, written June 6, 1848, recorded Nov. 3, 1857, in Beaver County, Pa., Will Book C, page 257. (2) The 1850, 1860 and 1870 censuses of New Sewickley Township, Beaver County, Pa. The 1870 Census states the Hannah’s parents were of foreign birth. "The History and Genealogy of the Pearsall Family in England and America," edited by Clarence Pearsall, 1928, page 1450, states that Samuel married Hannah Cheney. (3) 1850 and 1860 censuses. The Pearsall history lists Samuel’s children as: Ann, married Thomas Boggs, but the book also notes "the records of the Pennsylvania Bureau of Archives call her Elizabeth"; Mary S., married William Vezy; Hannah, married Daniel Campton; Sarah Ruth, married William Cochran; William C.; Nancy Jane, married James Cotton; Jacob, died in the army 1861-64. Since William does not appear in any census records, it seems likely that he died young, if we actually existed.


SAMPSON PIERSOL
Sampson Piersol was born about 1807 in Pennsylvania to Jacob and Elizabeth Piersol. (1)
Married Nancy, who was born about 1817 in Pennsylvania. (2)
Children: (3)
James, born about 1841.
Anna, born about 1846.
William, born about 1848.
Elizabeth, born about 1848. (William and Elizabeth were twins.)
Mary, born about 1850.
In the 1850 Census, Sampson Piersol is listed in New Sewickley Township, Beaver County, Pa. His is listed as a farmer who owned real estate valued at $2,400. His household contained Nancy; James, 9; Anna, 4; William, 2; Elizabeth, 2; and John Walker, 43, Labourer.
In the 1860 Census, Sams is listed as a farmer who owned real estate in New Sewickley valued at $3,140 and personal property valued at $835. His household also contained Nancy; James, 19, a farm hand; Ann, 15; William and Elizabeth, apparently 12-year-old twins since they are the same age and there’s a bracket to the left of their names; and Mary 10.
In the 1870 Census, Sampson Pearsoll is listed as a farmer who owned real estate valued at $7,000 and personal property valued at $800. His household contained Nancy; Emma, 24; William, 22, working on farm; Elizabeth, 22; Amanda, 19. His household is listed beside that of James J. Pearsall.
Sampson died Aug. 25, 1893. (4)
(1) Sampson is listed as a son in Jacob Piersol’s will, written June 6, 1848, recorded Nov. 3, 1857, in Beaver County, Pa., Will Book C, page 257. The censuses for 1850, 1860 and 1870 for New Sewickley Township, Beaver County, Pa., indicate that Sampson was born about 1807. However, Sampson was 88 when he died in 1893, according to "Registration of Deaths, Beaver County, Pennyslvania," compiled by Publishers of Beaver County Records, Helen G. Clear, Gladys G. Schmidt and Mae H. Winne, page 89. That would indicate he was born about 1805. (2) Census records indicate Nancy’s age and birthplace. "The History and Genealogy of the Pearsall Family in England and America," edited by Clarence Pearsall, 1928, page 1450, says that Sampson married Nancy Allison. (3) Census records. The 1860 Census indicates that William and Elizabeth were twins. The 1870 Census appears to list Anna as Emma and Mary as Amanda. The Pearsall history lists Sampson’s children as: William; James B.; Annie; Elizabeth, married James Wordman; and Amanda, unmarried. (4) "Registration of Deaths, Beaver County, Pennyslvania," compiled by Publishers of Beaver County Records, Helen G. Clear, Gladys G. Schmidt and Mae H. Winne, page 89.


JACOB PIERSOL
Jacob Piersol was born about 1815 in Pennsylvania to Jacob and Elizabeth Piersol. (1)
Married a woman named Eliza J. in 1859 or 1860. She was born about 1826 in Pennsylvania. (2)
Children: (3)
Sarah A., born about 1851.
Elizabeth, born about 1853.
George, born about 1855.
William, born about 1857.
Samuel, born about 1860.
Hiram, born aobut 1862.
Mary, born about 1864.
Cynthia, born about 1865.
In the 1850 Census, Jacob and Eliza are listed as living in the household of his father in New Sewickley Township, Beaver County, Pa.
In the 1860 Census, Jacob Piersol is listed as a farmer who owned real estate valued at $2,800 and personal property valued at $645. His household also contained Eliza; Sarah, 9; Elizabeth, 7; George, 5; William, 3; and Saml., 1.
In the 1870 Census, Jacob Pearsall is listed as a farmer who owned real estate valued at $6,500 and personal property valued at $800. His household contained Eliza J.; Sarah A., 19; Elizabeth, 17; George, 15; William, 13; Samuel, 10; Hiram, 8; Mary, 6; Cynthia, 5.
(1) Jacob is listed as the youngest son of Jacob Piersol in the elder Jacob’s will, written June 6, 1848 recorded Nov. 3, 1857 in Beaver County, Pa., Will Book C, page 257. His comes from the 1860 and 1870 censuses of New Sewickley Township, Beaver County, Pa. (2) The 1850 census indicates that Jacob and Eliza had been married within the previous year. Census records lists Eliza’s birthplace. They giver her ages as 24 in 1850, 33 in 1860 and 45 in 1870. "The History and Genealogy of the Pearsall Family in England and America," edited by Clarence Pearsall, 1928, page 1450, says Jacob married Eliza J. Hill. (3) 1870 Census. The Pearsall history lists Jacob’s children as Sarah, married Frank McCracken; Nancy; Elizabeth, married John Brewer; George; William J.; Samuel; Hiram; Mary; and Cynthia.

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