HomeAbout FoxwynMeet Our GirlsAbout CavaliersCavalier Care: Puppy and AdultBringing Home a PuppyPuppy PlacementPuppy ContractGrowth Plates in DogsDangerous Plants and Household ItemsBreed StandardFavorite ResourcesWeb LinksAnimal Planet Breed All About It! Cavaliers VideoPhotosContact Me/Puppy Inquiry Form

 
 
Puppies, like humans, have growth plates in their bodies, and this is a normal part of bone formation and development.  I recommend that puppies should be spayed or neutered at 10-12 months of age, due to the pups need to fully mature.  This is in the best interest of the pup's long term health and soundness. 
 
Please see the chart below, which lists only some of the growth plates in a dog's body, and the average number of days to maturity.  Maturation rates can vary by breed.
 
This is one of the biggest reasons that dogs who participate in agility are usually older.  Their trainers will not risk their young dogs in agility competitions due to the high probability of injury due to immature growth plates.
 
 
Some folks may advocate the spay/neuter procedure at a younger age.  In part, this may be because breeders are concerned about accidental breedings.  This is a ligitimate concern in some cases, but I think that should be weighed against the long term health of the puppy. 

 

 

EPIPHYSEAL PLATE CLOSURE IN DOGS

First broadcast on www.provet.co.uk on February 27th 2000. Focus on Orthopaedics Week

This information is provided by Provet for educational purposes only.

You should seek the advice of your veterinarian if your pet is ill as only he or she can correctly advise on the diagnosis and recommend the treatment that is most appropriate for your pet.

In evaluating radiographs of the skeleton of young animals it is important to know the usual closure times of growth plates in order to decide whether there is premature, or delayed closure.

The following tables list the range and average closure times (in days after birth) reported by different authors worldwide.

TABLE 1 - DOGS

Growth Plate

Closure - Range (days)

Closure - Average (days)

FORELIMB

Tuber scapulae

117-210

186

Proximal humeral epiphysis

273-465

375

Medial and lateral humeral condyles

138-236

187

Medial humeral epicondyle

187-240

216

Proximal radial epiphysis

136-330

258

Distal radial epiphysis

136-510

318

Proximal ulnar epiphysis

161-450

258

Distal ulnar epiphysis

217-450

308

Intermediate and radial carpal bones

101

Central carpal bone

110

Epiphysis of accessory bone

113-180

135

Proximal metacarpal epiphysis

145

Distal metacarpal epiphysis II-V

165-240

203

Proximal phalangeal epiphysis I

141

Proximal phalanx proximal epiphysis II-V

131-224

186

Middle phalanx. proximal epiphysis II-V

131-224

183

PELVIS

Acetabulum

112

Ilium

112

Ischium

112

Pubis

112

Tuber ischii

292

HINDLIMB

Femoral head

129-540

320

Femur - greater trochanter

129-540

320

Femur - lesser trochanter

129-360

269

Distal femoral epiphysis

136-392

330

Tibial condyles

143-413

322

Tibial tuberosity

143-435

249

Distal tibial epiphysis

136-495

313

Medial tibial malleolus

138

Proximal fibular epiphysis

136-360

297

Distal fibular epiphysis

136-495

288

Fibular tarsal bone

159

Tarsal bones III and IV

101

Distal metatarsal epiphysis II-V

165-270

217

Proximal phalangeal epiphysis II-V

161-210

187

Middle phalanx - proximal epiphysis II-V

161-210

187

The range of time reported for closure can be quite great making interpretation for any individual animal difficult.

CLICK HERE FOR TABLE 2 - CATS

(Table 1 Modified after Newton. D.M in Textbook of Small Animal Orthopaedics 1985, and used with permission of the Publishers L:ippincott, Williams and Wilkins)

Copyright (c) 1999 - 2009 Provet. All rights reserved. Email: info@provet.co.uk

 

 

Enter supporting content here