Ghanaian Food



A favorite food in Navrongo and all of Ghana is fufu. In Navrongo and the rest of Northern Ghana fufu consists of yams. Fufu in Southern Ghana is made of cassava and plaintain. Both types of Fufu are pounded with a huge wooden mortar and pestle until the foodstuffs glutinize into a big ball of, well, fufu. On the left is our friend Agnes and her daughter stopping for a photo while they pound some dinner.

Here you can see Agnes turning the ball of fufu while her daughter is pounding it. The fufu needs to be turned to ensure that all lumps have been pounded out. Rhythm is essential for both pounder and turner if stick and hand are not to meet!

On the left is Ida feeding rice and stew to her younger brother Ema (short for Emmanual). Wilfred in the yellow shirt on probably thinking about what mischief he'll get into next (he's a cyclone of trouble!).

The staple food for most people in Navrongo, Lawra, and the rest of Northern Ghana is TZ. It is a thickened porridge ball made from millet or corn flour. It is served with a stew. There are many different types of stews but my favorites are okra, bean leaf, and alayfu (a coarse green leafy vegetable).

On the ligher side of things you can take a look at a guinea fowl before and after dinner. (PETA members are discouraged from viewing the following page). You should also check out the Universal Method for cooking curries, stews and pots in one pot, on one stove, and in less than one hour. This guide was written for Volunteers who may have to improvise a variety of meals with a limited number of ingredients.

Finally, take a visit to the Ghana Cafe restaraunt, an authentic Ghanaian Restaurant in the heart of Adams Morgan, Washington, DC. The Ghana Cafe strives to make sure you thoroughly enjoy your dining experience. Enjoy delicious Ghanaian cuisine served fresh and hot, genuine African beer, gourmet coffee and tea. This page will also show you pictures of some well known Ghanaian dishes like Jollof Rice, Kenkey, Red-Red, and Wakye. Here's a link to their website.

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Last updated March 9, 2004.

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