76th SEABEES of World War II

SEABEES in Marine Uniform














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NAVY SEABEES IN MARINE CORP UNIFORMS

























































































SEABEES in Marine Corp (type) uniforms explains a lot about why SEABEES
 were not, and are not, recognized when in the midst of the fiercest battles of war, especially in the most forward parts of  beach assault invasions. They were, and are, dressed like Marines!
Then add to this the fact that entire SEABEE Battalions were described in the official orders of battle, during WWII, as Marine battalions. It's really not hard to see why SEABEES are not identified as SEABEES in the newsreels, in print articles or after-battle reports.
 
SEABEES in WWII, and afterwards, look exactly like the Marines they fight and die beside. Embedded correspondents didn't see or appreciate any difference between Marines and SEABEES, and the blindness of reporters to that distinction has continued every since!

 
 
Are the men in the Black & White WWII photos, below, MARINES or SEABEES?

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Hard to tell, isn't it?
 
They're SEABEES of the 76th NCB Detachment at Palmyra Island, going to General Quarters, 1944.
 
 

 
SEABEES or MARINES?

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These are 53rd SEABEES at Bouganville, WWII, November 1943.
 
 

 
 
SEABEES or MARINES?

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62nd SEABEES awaiting debarkation at Iwo Jima, 16 February, 1945.
 
 

 
 
MARINES or SEABEES?

iwoflagraising.jpg

 
 
World Famous Photograph
 
IF YOU DON'T KNOW THAT THE ABOVE IMAGE IS OF MARINES RAISING THE 'STAR AND STRIPES' ON IWO JIMA, 23 FEBRUARY 1945, ITS TIME TO GO BACK TO SCHOOL.
 
There are six Marine flag raisers in the photo. Four in the front line and two in back.

In front the four are (left to right) Ira Hayes, Franklin Sousley, John Bradley and Harlon Block.

The two in back are Michael Strank (behind Sousley) and Rene Gagnon (behind Bradley).

Strank, Block and Sousley would die shortly afterwards. Bradley, Hayes and Gagnon became national heroes within weeks.

 
 

 
 
Are these SEABEES or MARINES in the Color Photos?

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Still having a hard time telling?
 
SEABEES AGAIN!
 
Al Hillah, Iraq (May 27, 2003) -- Naval Mobile Construction Battalion Fifteen (NMCB-15) SEABBES pursue a man who was caught stealing from other local citizens while en route to a school-building project in Al Hillah. Although SEABEES are not assigned normal patrol duties, they may assist Iraqi citizens with law enforcement efforts. NMCB-15 is forward deployed to IRAQ and is working on various humanitarian assistance projects in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom. Operation Iraqi Freedom is the multi-national coalition effort to liberate the Iraqi people, eliminate Iraq's weapons, and end the regime of Saddam Hussein. U.S. Navy photo by Photographer's Mate 1st Class Arlo K. Abrahamson. (RELEASED)
 
 
 

OKAY YOU SHOULD BE A PRO NOW.
 
How about this one, below, are these Marines or SEABEES?

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This time its  Marines and Navy Corpsmen.
 
U.S. Marines and Navy Hospital Corpsmen carry wounded Marines out of a medical vehicle to stabilize them at the 1/8 Regimental Aid Station before evacuating them to a medical facility. The Marines were wounded during Operation Al Fajr (New Dawn) in the city of Fallujah, Iraq. Operation Al Fajr is an offensive operation to eradicate enemy forces within the city of Fallujah in support of continuing security and stabilization operations in the Al Anbar province of Iraq. Official U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Theresa M. Medina

 

 


OKAY, HERE IS ANOTHER MISLEADING PHOTO FOR YOU.
 
SEABEE or MARINE?

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This is a SEABEE manning a machine gun turret.
 

 Fallujah, Iraq (Nov. 17, 2004) - Construction Electrician 3rd Class Joe Tank (Seabee) mans a turret mounted M-240B machine gun atop a High Mobility Multipurpose Wheeled Vehicle (HMMWV) to provide security while Seabees assigned to Naval Mobile Construction Battalion Four (NMCB-4) clear debris from the streets of Fallujah, Iraq. NMCB-4 is homeported in Port Hueneme, California and is currently deployed in support of Operation Al Fajr (New Dawn). Operation Al Fajr is an offensive operation to eradicate enemy forces within the city of Fallujah in support of continuing security and stabilization operations in the Al Anbar province of Iraq. U.S. Navy photo by Photographer's Mate 2nd Class Philip Forrest (RELEASED)

 

 

One more time.
 
SEABEE or MARINE?

marinedozer.jpg

GOTTA BE A SEABEE!
NOPE. This is a Marine Combat Engineer.
 
U.S. Marine Corps Cpl. Wesley D. Porter, a heavy equipment operator with Marine Combat Service Support Battalion 7, lifts and transports items with a TRAM (Tractor, Rubber tired, Articulated steering, Multipurpose) at Camp Turaybil, Iraq, Jan. 5, 2005. Battalion combat engineers have spent the past three weeks refortifying Camp Turaybil after a suicide bomber drove his truck into the U.S. military compound here in December 2004, killing two Marines and injuring six others. U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Ryan B. Busse

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